1915 El Presidente  Vs. 1929 El Presidente Cocktail || Glen & Friends Cooking

1915 El Presidente Vs. 1929 El Presidente Cocktail || Glen & Friends Cooking


welcome friends welcome back to after
dark and today we’re going to do a cocktail called El Presidente and we’re
gonna do it two ways the first way we’re going to do it is as it was published in
1915 in a cocktail Manuel in Havana we start it with some orange liqueur we
give it two to three drops of Angostura one bar spoon of grenadine so this is
our homemade grenadine put that in an orange twist goes into the stirring
glass two ounces of dolan white and then it asks for light Cuban rum so I’ve got
a couple of options because I live in Canada if you live somewhere that Cuban
rum isn’t available Picardie would work just fine okay now we stir this with ice okay dump the ice out of the glass and
we pour it in and it says to finish with a cherry el Presidente cocktail number two is
from 1929 also from a cocktail book published in Havana and it starts out
with a little bit of grenadine and then 1/2 ounce of Jolin and then an ounce and
a half of light Cuban rum get some ice and a stirrer okay so ditch the ice our
cocktail glass strain and this one gets a twist of orange and I’m just gonna run
it around the rim just to see if I can get a little bit of that orange flavor
drops in and it also gets a cherry so and goes the cherry and so there you
have two versions of the El Presidente rum cocktail okay so these cocktails are
almost completely different I mean they both have rum they both have grenadine
they both have a cherry and they both have white vermouth but the proportions
are completely different and I’m I’m I don’t know what to think
let me try them hmm sharp very sharp the rum isn’t even
there the rum is way in the background most of what I can taste is the Dolan
which is because it’s most of the mixture and not very sweet at all at all completely different cocktail rum for
word for mouth way in the background in both cases there’s very little sweet
there’s nothing in there sweet to sort of balance out the alcohol and there’s
no bitter to sort of bring it all together that’s something that I’m
really missing from both of these cocktails is a bitter component I wonder
if a couple of dashes of orange bitters would really sort of knock that out of
the park I don’t know that the Angostura is really doing what it needs to do I
don’t think that it’s forward enough I might add some orange bitters on top of
the Angostura just to kind of round it out I don’t know going back to it though
and this site this is something I find kind of odd if you watch the episode
where I did the whiskey cocktail and then the improved whiskey cocktail which
incidentally had 14 years between them and these also have 14 years between
them but the whiskey cocktail and the improved whiskey cocktail went from
simple to complicated and I liked the simple version this went from
complicated to simple and I like the complicated version I definitely like
the complicated version although the simplified version has got something
going for it too but I would not consider these the same cocktail
they’re called the same cocktail and they follow the same pattern and if you
look at the recipes from 1915 to 1929 and there’s four or five in the middle
you can see how they continually simplified the recipe to make it
something easier to make probably at the bar something that was cheaper to make
at the bar so they’re the same cocktail they’re from the same family but they’re
completely different and I think if I was expecting this one and I got this
one I’d be disappointed and if I was expecting this one and I got this one I
would be disappointed completely different I think you should try them I
think you should try these cocktails and compare them and see what you think and
also play with the rums the rum is going to give you a completely different
flavor especially in this one the newer one where rum is right at the front so I
think with this one all I did was confuse everybody thanks for stopping by
hope to see you again soon you

38 thoughts on “1915 El Presidente Vs. 1929 El Presidente Cocktail || Glen & Friends Cooking”

  1. 0:34 You get more oils to release from the orange peel if you literally twist it, letting the oils fall into the glass, before dropping the whole peel in.

  2. You used the wrong Vermouth you should have used White Vermouth (aka Blanc Vermouth, aka Bianco Vermouth) and you used a dry vermouth the white vermouth is sweeter than the dry vermouth but not as sweet as the sweet vermouth.

  3. Don't think it would matter that much, but I do believe both of these cocktails require a stem in cherry.

    Was still quite informative and fun to watch 🙂

  4. I mean. It makes sense that they’re different cocktails.

    There would have been a different president 10 years later 😂

  5. Cuba was a happen' place before the embargo. We vacationed there a year prior to the meetings between the Americans and the Cubans were publicized. What was amazing was how the embargo and communism had combined to produce a people who are at once resourceful and completely lacking in ambition. I know I'll get flack for that. We saw how tourism drove the economy near the ports and big cities and then witnessed the poverty and privation in the interior. I hope that this rich culture can come out from both forms of oppression.

  6. Brugal brand, which is available in those places that don't allow Cuban rum, is a lovely rum that could be a suitable substitute. It's better than the pirate brand.

  7. Definitely would use the original as a base and change the vermouth and rum balance (1½ ounce of each, maybe) to get a more "rounded" favor profile. Orange bitters are a good call, too.

  8. Hey Glen! Great vid! Just something I thought I'd share; although you are correct that the recipe calls for white or "Blanc" Vermouth, what you are using is dry Vermouth, which is very different. Many modern recipes use dry Vermouth, but the original recipe used Blanc. There's a great article by David Wondrich on Punch Magazine if your want to look into it. If you ever get the chance to try them again with Blanc Vermouth (which dolin also makes) I think you'd really enjoy it! Cheers!

  9. Maybe a dash of grapefruit bitters on top? Aromatic and possibly, slowly, cuts through the heavy flavor profile. I’m currently experimenting with 1.5 oz each of Dolin Blanc and a super dry white rum like Brugal, Flor de Caña or even the Bacardi cuts through really well in fruit forward cocktails. I also think dry curacao works better than Cointreau here. A long stir for added dilution because the cocktail seems very viscous. A followup video would be quite enjoyable as I’ve been bitten by the El Presidente bug lately. Even thought about maybe a .25 oz Wray and Nephew Overproof White rum floater to give it a little funk and zing. Cheers!

  10. I was actually hoping you were going to go grab bitters to stir in a dash after you mentioned it, just to see how it would change the flavor profile.

  11. What era do you think had the best cocktails in your opinion? You talked about how it sort of is a pendulum of simple to complex, what do you like best?

  12. Rum drinks always confuse me because 'rum' is a spirit with so many diverse flavors depending on what was done to the cane syrup. I think I'll choose the Beef and Biscuits, coming up next!

  13. Usually it's a dash of bitters not a drop. I'd be very curious to hear your opinion on the taste if you try those recipes using dashes of bitters considering you felt it was a missing element. The grenadine should also be adding the sweetness that the drink needs.

  14. Same name 2 different cocktails both delicious. My take on the difference of the two in regards to the vermouth is the original had some Spanish origins. I remember viewing some travel/cooking shows where the vermouth is on tap in establishments. So, the 1915, a vermouth cocktail with rum accent. The 1929 version (more Cuban influenced)is a rum cocktail with a vermouth accent.
    I missed which was your preference. But for me it would depend on the occasion. If it were the middle of Summer and it was 30+ Celsius in the shade, my first choice would be the 1915. Not too "boozy" and would be able to enjoy a couple-two-or three on the patio, and I won't get "stoopid-drunk."
    Now for the second version that would be just a one or two drink maximum. Then call it a night.
    But that is my take on this wonderful cocktail. Thank you so much for your presentation.

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