Braised pork belly with taro (芋头扣肉) – How to make in 4 steps

Braised pork belly with taro (芋头扣肉) – How to make in 4 steps


In this video I’m gonna show you how to prepare the Chinese braised pork belly with taro. It is called Kao Yuk in Chinese which means inverted pork. That’s actually what it means! The meat is braised in a deep bowl and invert onto a plate and serve up -ended. Step 1- Prepare the pork for braising. The preparation before putting the pork belly into the braising liquid affects the quality of the dish. This step include blanching the pork to remove the untoward pork smell. Apply some soy sauce to the surface to get a better appearance and pan-fry in the skin side to create the aroma. This is pork belly- layers of fat alternate with lean meat, perfect for this dish. Then we have the red preserved bean curd and then Shaoxing wine, oyster sauce, five-spice powder, white pepper marinade with this pork, and the dark soy, sauce to apply on the skin to improve the color of the pork. First, blanch the pork. Blanching helps to remove the unwanted smell of pork. Blanch the pork belly until you can use the tip of the chopstick to pierce into the flesh. It takes about 10 minutes. Then remove and drain. Next puncture the skin. Puncture the skin with the tip of the chef’s knife. This step creates plenty of small holes in the skin. When you deep fry the pork later, the skin may tend to crack due to high heat. Pricking small holes can prevent the skin from cracking. Then after pricking holes apply some dark soy sauce on the skin. The dark soy sauce help to add color for better appearance. Set you aside for 15 to 30 minutes or until the pork is dry before deep-frying. Then pan fry the skin until he turns crispy and aromatic. Heat up about half an inch of oil in a flat pan or wok over medium heat. Gently lower down the pork belly, skin side down into the oil and pan fry the skin until crispy and golden brown. You may cover the wok or the pan if the oil splatter too much. Put the pork on the chopping board skin side down and cut it into slices about 5mm thick, Marinate the pork with the set of seasoning that I have shown you just now. I’ve just made a batch of pork belly with taro recently by following a recipe that does not require marination. Although it is an easy recipe, but I find that it does not deliver the desired flavor as intense as the marinated version as I shown you now. Step two- prepare the taro. After you get the right taro, prepare it by following the following steps. Cut the taro into two and then quarter and then into slices of about 5mm thick. Some people may find that taro can irritate your skin, due to the presence of oxalic crystals, but luckily. I’m not allergic to it, so I’m fine. If it is, put on your glove before handling it if you’re allergic to it. Heat up about half an inch of vegetable oil in a frying pan or a wok over medium heat. Pan fry the taro slices until both sides are brown and crispy. Then remove and drain away the oil on paper towels. Marinated taro slices with the fermented red bean curd, some Shaoxing wine and the five-spice powder. Be gentle when you mix the taro with the marinade because there are quite fragile. Step 3 preparing a sauce , this savory sauce is entirely different from the ordinary braising liquid. The hero with the sauce is the preserved red bean curd. This fermented bean curd has a very strong savory flavor very much like fermented cheese. Therefore it is only required a small amount for large pot of meats. This ingredient is very popular among the Chinese which you should be able to get it in most of the Asian grocery shop. Some vegetable oil, to saute the garlic and the onions. Saute until fragrance then add the red preserve bean curd, Shaoxing wine, sugar and the star anise which is optional and some chicken stock or just plain water to make the sauce. Saute the garlic and the shallots in the vegetable oil until aromatic. Then add the preserved red bean curd into the wok, then add the rest of ingredients- the stock, Five-spice powder, wine, star a nice, light soy sauce, salt, sugar everything into the wok, bring it to a boil and let it simmer for five minutes to reduce to a quarter of the volume. Step 4- Braise the pork and enjoy. The final step is to braise the pork and the taro slices with the sauce. It may takes a while but I’m sure it is worth for the wait, when aroma from the lengthy braising drifting in from the kitchen. Arrange the pork and taro slices alternate one with another in a standing position. We have the pork skin side down in a large bowl. Make sure you pack the taro and pork slices upright like a pack of cards and tightly in a bowl so that they will stick together when it is served. Pour the sauce over the pork and taro. the sauce will seep through the layers eventually. Braise the pork on a steamer over medium heat, lid on for about two hours, or until the pork and taro slices are soft. Then pour the excess braising liquid in a bowl carefully so that the pork and the taro slices are firmly sitting in a bowl. Heat up the braising liquid and reduce it to a thick sauce. Invert the bow on a plate. Remove the bowl so that the pork is now served up-ended. Poured the thicken braising liquid on it and serve along with some simple Asian greens such as bok choy or Chinese lettuce. I’ve just show you how to prepare this fabulous Chinese pork belly with taro in four simple steps. You can get a recipe, the video and the detail cooks note at my blog: http://tasteasianfood.com/pork-belly-taro/ If you like this video, please subscribe to my YouTube channel by clicking the button below and until then, I’ll see you in the next video. Bye for now.

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