Brewed in New York – Brown’s Segment

Brewed in New York – Brown’s Segment


(upbeat music) – It’s not generally
hard to find businesses, that have been opened
more than 20 years, but it is uncommon in New
York’s craft beer scene. Many of the breweries
we visit on this show opened in the last few years as part of the state’s
craft beer awakening and when the Browns opened
their tap room in 1994, brew pubs were a foreign
concept to New Yorkers. Luckily young people in the
region embraced Brown’s Brewing and flocked to this
unique Troy destination for celebrations
and first dates. Now 24 years later,
the Browns’ business has grown by leaps and bounds and their loyal customers
have grown up with them. Their recent expansion,
the Malt Room caters to those life
long patrons now looking for a more sophisticated
craft beverage experience. What do you say we go inside and see what we can
learn from the pros? – I’m Kelly Brown. – I’m Gary Brown, we’re the owners of
Brown’s Brewing Company and we’ve been in business
here for 24 years. – My first experience with
craft beer was through Gary. – I consider myself a 1980’s
home brewer, if you will, and that led to traveling
mostly out to the West coast, because this is
where the resurgence of craft brewing was happening. Experiencing what was
going on out there was important to be able
to start this project. – We found this beautiful,
old, abandoned building in Troy and he said, “I wanna do this!” And I said, okay, you
know, I’m with you. – People did think
we were crazy, I think a lot of
people didn’t think we would even get
the doors open, much less make it
in business in Troy. – It was 1990 and
no one had heard of, you know, brew pubs
here on the East coast. – We may not have realized
the extent of the risk, which I think maybe
when you’re younger, it’s kind of a blessing,
that you don’t know. Looking back, it’s
pretty impressive, what we did manage
to accomplish. – One reporter described
us as a landmark and it just hits me and
I’m so humbled by it, so proud of the growth in Troy. Troy has such a rich history, being right on the beautiful,
majestic Hudson River, that’s really important
to New York State. – Hopefully we helped
open some eyes to people, that eventually have
come here to settle, either to live or open
businesses or what have you, it’s a great place to live. There have been a
couple of beers, that we just know
we can’t do without, Oatmeal Stout is one of them and it’s great to
have a beer like that in a heavily IPA-flooded market, so it sets us apart a bit. – [Kelly] We have two tap rooms, one in Hoosick Falls
and one in Troy, we have Revolution
Hall, our event space and we have this beautiful
space, the Malt Room. – [Gary] In 2012 we decided
to build out this space and kind of work
on our relevance going into our 20th
year at that point by showing off what we can do through cask-produced beers and also fine liquors, wines,
and things of that nature. – We have more than a
handful of customers that have been with
us from day one and I love the Malt
Room for the idea, that a lot of them, you
know, the loud music that was really appealing
to the younger days, our music down here
in the Malt Room is no louder than a
conversation, so it allows people to enjoy both
spaces for various reasons. – So Gary’s gonna tell me a
little bit about cask beer. I’m sitting in front of
a full pint of Pale Ale poured out of a
carbonation-controlled,
traditional tap and Gary, you’re gonna pour
me another beer from the cask. – Okay. Right through this beer engine, drawing it from the
cask below the bar. – [Matt] How hard do you
have to pull that thing? – Oh, not too hard,
if I pull it too fast, I might put too much foam in it. – Yeah, and so you
manually pumped that up, that is not
pressured down below, you really pulled that beer up? – You’re actually drawing
it out of the cask, where this is being
pushed by carbonation, by CO2, I should say,
through the draft lines, through the faucet
and into your glass. – That is an amazing pour
and I can see in the head, that there are larger bubbles and it’s dissipating
a little more quickly. – [Gary] Right, exactly. – And the temperature’s
a little different, so this is, you know, ice
cold out of your taps. – [Gary] Yep. – And this one is cold,
– Yeah. – but not as cold. – Right, you’re looking at about a 20 degree difference
in temperature there, which is again a traditional way the beer would have been poured from the cellars
of a London pub. – Hm-mm, and even just
that few degrees warmer, I’m getting so much
aroma out of that. – Yeah. – I mean, there’s, I can tell
the flavor’s gonna be big. – Yeah, temperature in
beer have a huge impact on the aroma and
the taste notes, that you’re gonna get from it. – You know, some
bars will have a cask every once in a while,
sitting on top of the bar, but you have built in a
temperature-controlled, three-handle system.
– Yeah. – I mean, someone
could come here to historic Troy, New
York, come to the Malt Room and have an authentic
beer poured in the way it would have been
poured 100 years ago. – You’re correct, I
mean, Brown’s Brewery is the 22nd brewery to
operate in the city of Troy. – Hm. – You know, we were
the first brewery to operate in 40 years, when
we came on board in 1993. – Wow, Gary, thank you so
much for the information and the experience
of getting to drink ale right out of the cask. – Yeah, thank you for coming, it’s a pleasure to be
able to show this off and it’s what makes it worth
coming to work in the morning. Offering cask, to me is just
another adventure in brewing and it allows our brewers
to expand their horizons and we present that
to our customer. – We surround ourselves with
the best, positive group of people that we can
surround ourselves with and try to do the
best that we can do and at the end of the
day, if you’ve done the best you can do for your
customer, your employee, you know, just pick up a
pint and celebrate that. – Cheers.
– Cheers.

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