Brewed in New York – Chautauqua Region Full Episode

Brewed in New York – Chautauqua Region Full Episode


– [Maya] Westward, ho! In this episode, we’re headed
to the southwest corner of the state, where we’ll
meet a brewing legend, taste everything from blueberry
to bourbon flavored beer, and even learn how to
grow fish at a brewery, on Brewed in New York,
Chautauqua-Allegheny. Discover even more local
foods and beverages at Taste New York locations
throughout the state. Whether you’re at a
state park, sporting event, or stopping at one of our
New York welcome centers, it’s never been easier
to choose local and buy New York. Unalam, a family owned business
in upstate New York serving the building industry
for over a century. You can spot Unalam’s finely
crafted timber products in breweries throughout New York
State and beyond. Learn more at unalam.com 1886 Malt House proudly partnering with
New York’s finest grain growers to produce locally sourced,
high quality malt. for farm and craft breweries. The Northeast Hop Alliance Farmers, brewers,
and educators working together to
provide high quality, locally grown hops
to craft beer consumers in New York and
the Northeast. (upbeat rock music) – If you’ve never been
Chautauqua-Allegheny region, it’s definitely worth the trip. This beautiful county
has more farms than any in the U.S. and water front
property is everywhere. – But let’s be
honest, when I go, I want to check
out the breweries. – Matt ventured out to
Lakewood, New York, and got to visit a craft beer giant,
Southern Tier Brewing. I think it’s safe to say he
was over the moon about it. – Oh, that Steinecker
Brewhouse, well, you’ve just got to
see it to understand. Visiting Southern
Tier today, you’d have no idea that it had
humble beginnings. The campus is home not
only to the brewery, but an enormous warehouse
and even a distillery. It’s beautiful grounds
and wetland preserve boast two taprooms, an
outdoor patio and stage, even a stones course,
making it the perfect place for visitors to kick
back on a summer day. Founder, Phin Demink,
started out brewing with his brother-in-law in
Ellicottville, New York, and then learned production
brewing at Goose Island. In 2002, the opportunity
presented itself to purchase used
brewing equipment for pennies on the dollar, and
Southern Tier was born. But the taste of craft beer was still new to
upstate New Yorkers, and Phin had to work hard
to build the business. – In the early years,
I spent a lot of time driving across New York
state, trying to get wholesalers to just
pick our products up. – How did it go? – It took some time,
in those days the interest didn’t exist,
I’d go in and wholesalers would refer to craft
as, “Oh, this is that funny beer that
we’ve been hearing about.” For every yes, we got 20 no’s. – But the people who
said yes, their eyes must have lit up when
they first tried that. – The funny thing is once
you get into craft beer– – There’s no going back. – [Phin] You don’t go back,
it’s like you found something, you discovered something,
and it’s good, it’s amazing. I just said, we’ve gotta package
beer, we gotta bottle beer, you can’t just fill kegs
we’ll never survive, so I started going
to the chains that would listen that were
into gourmet products and I was able to get my
beer into their coolers. And that was a big
game changer for us. – A lot has changed
since those early days. Southern Tier’s grown to
be one of the largest craft breweries in the country, with
distribution to 38 states. You may know them by their
famous Pumking Imperial ale, but they also offer a
broad range of styles and flavors that are
born out of creative collaboration, and
skilled technique. Do you still do a lot
of the brewing now? – I do a lot of the
innovation, now we have an innovation team,
so it’s a little bit more of a
calculated process, has some analytics,
has creativity, so it’s different
but it’s still fun. – Take me through the process of how a new beer
comes to be made. – You have a bucket
that’s just full of crazy innovation– – I love it. – Some things are safe,
some things are risky, and anybody in our
building, on our sales team, they can throw anything
into this bucket. – What’s a really risky idea
that you’re never gonna do? – There’s been bubble
gum beer, one of the things incorporated
Mountain Dew. (laughs) So it’s just some
really oddball stuff. You never know, you
never know what’s going to be the
next greatest thing. – Sure, well I know down
in the city recently, the chocolate orange people were talking about, and
that was delicious. – Yeah, I mean, we definitely found a niche with
our dessert beers– – Yeah. – 10% rich stouts,
that resemble desserts like creme brulee,
or chocolate orange, I remember every
year at Christmas, I’d get those little orange– – Me, too. – Chocolates that you wack
and they open up, some of the inspiration just comes
from simple things like that. – It’s amazing that
Blackwater Series really delivers on the
flavor it’s promising, too. How is brewing different now
than when you first opened? – Definitely now, as we’re
producing larger volumes, as we’re shipping to
broader territories, quality really starts to
become a primary focus, so with that, you need to
start upgrading your equipment, you need packaging lines
that deliver low level to dissolved oxygen
which stales beer, because we don’t pasteurize,
we have to be very sanitary, and then I upgraded the
equipment to have automation, I remember the early days
when I was running around with kettles and flipping valves and I was really part of the
process, I was the process. I want my brewers to be
focused on making sure the hops go in at the right
time, the enzyme activity is correct, so the beer ends
up at the right dryness, or the right sweetness,
the things that matter. – I got to chance to
see the automation Phin was talking
about first hand. Southern Tier’s VP of
brewing and operations, Matt Dunn, took me
behind the scenes of this massive high tech brewery. – To the malt room, guys! (upbeat music) – So this is gonna be
our malt cleaning room. We receive 50 thousand
pound shipments of malt. There’s rocks, and wire and
a lot of dust in that malt, so we need to clean it before
we put it in our wet mill. – So this is a really serious apparatus for cleaning malt. – Yes, it is, yep, if
we don’t clean our malt really well, we’re going
to ruin our wet mill. – Gotcha, all right what’s next? – We send this malt over
to the mill, check it out. (upbeat music) – So this is brewhouse
one, this is 110 barrel brewhouse, so about every
three hours, we’re starting a batch that’s gonna end up
as 110 barrels of beer. – Yeah. – It was custom made for us by Steinecker in Germany in
2012, brought over here on boats and we built
this building around it. – It’s very clean. – Yeah, thank you, we pride ourselves on keeping it
really, really clean. – So can I touch this? – No, you cannot
touch these vessels. (laughing) – So what are these
massive tanks here? – We have a five
vessel brewhouse. Our wet mill is actually
under that vessel, that’s our grist case, our
mash tun, our water tun, our kettle and our whirlpool. From here, once
we make the wort, we’re gonna send it
over to the cellar and pitch yeast into it
so let’s check it out. (upbeat music) – So welcome to the yeast room, from our brewhouse, we
send wort all the way across the building 300
yards into this valve nest– – Wow. – The same automation that
controls our brewhouse, controls this valve nest and all the machinery in
this room, where we grow yeast, store
yeast, and pitch yeast. – And this is all controlled through this
computer system here? – That’s right, the
same software that controls our brewhouse, also
controls the yeast room. – All right so, once the
yeast is pitched, then what? – To put yeast in the wort,
we’re going to send it to one of the cellars,
let’s check out cellar two. – Love it. – This is the big cellar,
or our outdoor cellar, we have 12 660, 880
barrel tanks in this room, so they’re really big and they
stick out above the building, that’s why they call
it the outdoor cellar. – So these are the bottoms
and they go really high? – That’s right, they go about four stories
up in the air. – Wow. – Yep, so there’s
about 12 thousand 12 ounce bottles in
one of these 660’s. – I know you have a big state of the art
canning line, too. – Yep, we sure do and it’s right
in the next room over here. – Let’s go take a look. – Let’s check it out. – Welcome to the can line, Matt. – Wow, this thing is
really big and really loud. – Yeah, it sure is,
we’re scrambling right now to keep up with over pack. Our 15 can variety
pack that has three different cans of five
different beers in it. – So this is pilsner
that you’re canning now? – This is pilsner right now and we’re packaging it
into these open 30 pack trays, which are
then sent off to a third party to mix
into the variety pack. – What percentage of your
beer is being sold in cans? – We’re about 15%
cans right now, about 50% bottles and 35% draft. – And the can is growing or not? – Yep, can’s are
definitely growing, mainly driven by that over
pack can variety pack. – Gotcha, well thank you so much for showing
me around today! – Yeah! – This is a really
impressive facility! – Sure, thanks for coming
out, loved having ya. – Thanks, man. – All right, cheers. – Cheers, indeed.
Before we left, Matt took good care of our
crew with fresh samples. Yeah, right off the line! Nothing more refreshing
than the perfect pilsner, but this wasn’t the last sample
I enjoyed at Southern Tier. We’re back in the tap
room and I’m about to have an experience not many
people are going to get, Phin is gonna give me a guided tasting of three of their beers. So what do we have here? – We have our IPA,
our Nu Skool IPA, and we also have our
3 Citrus Peel Out. – All right, I know I like this IPA so let’s start there. – Yep, so this is legacy beer, we’ve been making
this since 2003, it’s a little bit more malty, very pronounced
bitterness, and it’s kind of got your classic C hops: Cascade, Centennial, Columbus. Very balanced beer. – Yeah that to me, that’s what I think of as like a
classic IPA of the region. – So the next beer that we have is Nu Skool IPA, 60
IBU’s, it’s 6% alcohol, it’s a smoother
beer, dryer finish, not as malty, the hops
that we use in this are more tropical, so we
have Ekuanot, Mosaic, and those hops are very
pineapple, passion fruit. – And just to be
clear, those are notes that we’re getting from
the hops, no fruit is added. – There is no fruit in
Nu Skool, that tropical flavor is all coming from
the pedigree of hops. So where this has two and
a half pounds per barrel, this is about four pounds
per barrel, and you know I love them both,
I go old school and I go Nu Skool all the time. (laughing) We also have our
3 Citrus Peel Out, which is a summer innovation, it pushes the envelope
of flavor, extremely
citrus forward, 8% alcohol, sparkling
clean, and also something that could potentially
drift between the lines of beer and cocktails. – It does taste
like a mimosa to me, it even finishes
dry, it’s got like a vinous wine quality in
the way it finishes to me. – Yep, I mean, definitely
people that are more wine drinkers
than IPA drinkers can identify with this product. – Sure. – It’s good boat beer, we like boat beer here in
Chautauqua county. (laughing) – Well, thank you
so much for showing these to me, I’ve been
following your story from the city, but it’s
really great to meet you, it must be great edifying
to see how far you’ve come. – It is, it’s rewarding, but
the most rewarding thing is it’s never felt like a job,
it’s always been a hobby. – Amazing. – A big hobby. (upbeat music) – The nearby brewery, where
Phin Demink got his start, owned by his brother
in law, is still alive and thriving, with
multiple locations and a widely recognized
brand, so lets head down the road to see
what’s happening today at Ellicottville
Brewing Company. The setting for this
brewery, is a quaint vacation town that relies on an influx
of skiers every winter. Raising it’s population
from 356 registered voters to 10
thousand weekenders. From the beginning,
founder Peter Kreinheder, seems to have mastered
the recipe for success. – We opened up in
September of ’95, it was probably the
best snow season ever. There was six
inches of fresh snow almost everyday
for three months. Phin had terrific beer,
so out of the gate, we had really good
beer, we had really good food, and we
had really good snow, so you really couldn’t
mess up that mix. – [Maya] Although,
there may have been some luck involved
early on, it’s clear that Peter’s business
savvy and attention to dining detail is responsible for the companies steady growth. EBC quickly became a critical
part of Ellicottville tourism experience,
and soon turned outward to distribution of some of
it’s most popular brews. – We do a bunch of
different IPA’s, Fistful of Peel, some
sour beers, particularly our Raspberry Beret, which
has done really well for us. – Our most successful
distributed beer, would have to be
the Blueberry Wheat, it’s everyone’s favorite,
it accounts for about 60% of our beer sales. – All kinds of people
come in and drink it. It’s just a really nice,
approachable beer, it’s light bodied, it’s not sweet at
all and it has a great aroma. – We’re an intro
to craft, there are way more domestic drinkers
out there than craft, and so our Blueberry
allows people to step into that category, without
jumping to a 11% imperial IPA. – [Maya] Confident in
Ellicottville’s market niche, Peter still enjoys some
friendly competition with his brother in laws
neighboring brewery. – So Phin introduces a raspberry beer like in 2006, and he goes, “You’re no longer going
to be the fruit king.” (laughing) I’ll never forget
him saying that. – [Maya] All kidding aside,
Ellicottville is a model of smart and steady
brewery growth. – Running a brewery in today’s craft industry, is
very competitive. The growth of our
company is important to us, but we want
to be strategic. – We have a ski town location, then we have a university
college town, and then last year we opened up our
summer vacation lake pub. We have all the Chautauqua
Institute people that come in from
New York, Pittsburgh, international, so we
have this triangle all going on, and
in the center of it, we’re building our production
facility right now. We’ll have a small pub there,
a little nice tasting pub. Little Valley needs a
little boost of something, so take our Ellicottville,
that does really well, and transition some
of that growth outside of the village and
then we’ll have buses that take people back and forth. – A large part of
what Peter is doing is building a community,
he’s providing an opportunity for people
in our area to better themselves and provide
for their families. – I grew up in Cattaraugus
so it’s exciting for me to see something
going in so close to my home town and helping
the local community with jobs. – [Maya] As critical as EBC
has become to the regional economy, their founding
slogan, Brewed to Entertain, still guides the
lighthearted vacation vibe that permeates all
their locations. – Ellicottville is a laid
back, come to vacation, have fun kind of area,
we want you to come here, relax, have fun
and enjoy our beer. – Traveling to discover
new sights and new tastes is what beer tourism
is all about, but plan ahead to use
public transportation, ride sharing, or a
designated driver. Never drink and drive. The Chautauqua-Allegheny
region has a a reputation for intellectual
curiosity and culture. Nowhere is this more
embodied, than here, at the Chautauqua
Institution, a 750 acre campus that draws thousands of students of all
ages, every summer. We’re lucky enough
to be visiting during the annual food festival. There’s a lot going
on here to check out, so I’m gonna go explore and
maybe even learn something. This place has been
around since 1874, and they keep visitors
coming back by offering new content based
around a theme each week. The theme when I was
there, explored the human relationship with food and
beverage, hence, the festival. Immediately digging in, I
took a test to learn about the sensitivity of my palate,
turns out I’m a hyper taster, and watched a presentation on
creating cocktails using beer. – So we took these local
peaches, roasted them down with honey and thyme,
blended that down and added a little
bit of wine vinegar, and a little bit of
sweetener, chill that down and just add it to
the beer, so it’s a low proof cocktail, it’s
very refreshing in the summertime, and it works
really well with wheat beers. – You’ve been in western
New York for a while, there’s a lot of
breweries around here. – Absolutely, they’re
popping up all over. – What are some of the things in the beer scene that you’re
really excited about? – To see how collaborative
they are together, I think it’s great
because the level of quality beers actually
going up with it. – Clearly he isn’t the
only one who think so. The beer tents at the
festival were buzzing with enthusiastic
tasters, and it was great to see a flavor curious crowd. In fact, broadening horizons is what this place seems
to be all about. With it’s extensive
offering of classes, shows, concerts, and recreation, it’s no mystery why the
Chautauqua Institution remains such a popular summer
destination in Western New York. (bell ringing) – When you visit your local
watering hole, beer may be the most visible item
sold on the front of the bar, but there’s a good chance
that what’s on tap is sharing some space behind
the bar with a variety of wines and spirits, so
what’s the difference? You could write
volumes on the subject, but for our purposes,
we’re going to highlight ingredients, production
process, and ABV. Traditionally, beer is made from cereal grains, like
barley, wheat, or rye. Brewers boil the grain
to release the sugar, cool the resulting
liquid, and add yeast. Beer is a fermented
beverage, so this means that yeast eats all that
sugar and produces alcohol. The beer is filtered
to remove the yeast, and is carbonated
to make it fizzy. The amount of alcohol
varies from beer to beer, but typically runs
between 3 to 6% ABV. Wines are primarily
made from fruit, with grapes being the
most popular by far. The fruit is crushed
to make juice, which is loaded with sugar,
wine like beer is fermented. So yeast is added to
the juice and is put in a closed container so
the yeast can do it’s magic. Spirits or liquor, in
contrast to beer and wine, are distilled, distilling
is a way of condensing and upping the alcohol content. These drinks start out
a lot like beer or wine, fermenting away in
a closed container. But the yeast can
only take it so far, at a certain point, the
alcohol yeast produces becomes toxic to itself,
so it can’t ferment a beverage much passed
15 or 16% on it’s own. So here’s how distilling
works, alcohol boils at 172 degrees Fahrenheit, but
water doesn’t boil until 212 degrees, so
distillers boil the liquid at a temperature
just above 172 degrees, this vaporizes the alcohol,
and leaves the water behind. Cooling the vapor and
collecting the resulting liquid, can result in ABV’s
ranging anywhere from 20% to nearly 95%, whoa,
that’s got some kick! In fact, they’re so strong
they’re rarely consumed neat, meaning by
themselves, cocktail anyone? And by the way, New York
state has amazing local wine and craft spirits,
too, but that’s a subject for a whole
different series. – Most of the places we
visit on Brewed in New York, do one thing exceptionally
well, make beer. But there are benefits
to multitasking. Today I’m visiting Five
& 20 Spirits & Brewing, founded by Mario Mazza,
who’s family has been in the western New York wine
business for over 45 years. With this venture,
Mazza has perfected the art of the
crossover, from wine to spirits, to beer,
with refreshing results. – Some wineries loathe breweries that come into the neighborhood because they detract
from their business. Our approach was if you
can’t beat em, join em. – After studying chemical
engineering in college, Mario was keen to add distilling
to the family business. He started with
fruit based alcohol, since grapes were
easy to come by. When he wanted to branch
into grain based spirits, Mario realized that by
adding a few extra tanks to his equipment purchase, he
could start brewing as well. – There’s that kind of
argument, that you can be a jack of all trades
and master of none, I don’t necessarily
agree with that, there is a little bit of
crossover with some staff and that’s actually
intentional because now a distiller will
work over on the wine side and learn something
and translate that over. Or one of the wine making
team members will work over on the brewery
side and learn wow, that’s an interesting
way to set that up. So our experience has
been that it’s helped improve the quality
across the board. – Multitasking has also
allowed for some creative barrel repurposing and
experimentation with flavor. – We have wine barrels that
move over to the distillery, so they were aged in port
sherry or fortified wines and then we will maybe finish
our rye whiskey in those. We have rye whiskey barrels
that after we dump them we can’t use them
again for whiskey, but the really cool crossover
product is using those barrels now for beer projects, and that’s something I
think every brewer is jealous of because
I’m not going out to some barrel mongerer and saying, okay I don’t really know
where that came from and I don’t really
know what the quality of the barrel is,
we have control, – This strategic
control has lead to some really outstanding beers
as I would soon find out. – I’m here in the
Five & 20 barrel room, with Joe, who is the
distiller here, but he also started as a
brewer, and I know this rye pale ale is one of yours. – Yeah, absolutely. – So tell me what’s in this. – So this is actually
some locally grown New York malt, and locally
grown New York hops, but we’re using our
dry hop on this. – Wow, that is really excellent. It has that rye spiciness
but there’s a slight sweetness to the malt that
I’m really loving on it. That’s one of the better
rye beers I’ve had. – Thank you. – Yeah, so now
this is essentially the same beer, aged in
rye whiskey barrels. – In our own rye
whiskey barrels, yeah. – How long do you keep the
beer in a rye whiskey barrel? – Until it’s done, (laughs) no, actually we age
this about six months. – Wow, that’s a long time. – Yeah you get a
nice caramel wood sugar from the
barrel, specifically, but you also get that nice
breathy note from the whiskey. – It still drinks
like beer, though. – Right, absolutely, so the last in the line, is our Stout Lucia, aged in St. Lucian
rum barrels that come directly from
the Caribbean. – Wow, that is different. – So it’s a heavier ester rum, but there’s also a
lot of really nice burnt sugar, caramel kind
of characters as well. – This is like one
of those special beers you open with
your beer nerd friend. – It really is, yeah, for sure. – Thank you for
sharing these with me. I really admire what you’re
doing with your barrel program. It actually really
sets you guys apart. – Yeah it gives us a
greater palate of flavors to work from that
we can build on in the beer program especially. – Long before the
beer hits the barrel, Mario Mazza works to
ensure the ingredients going into Five &
20’s beer are grown locally and celebrate the
agriculture of the region. Leveraging his family’s
experience with growers, he runs a small farm on
the property in order to provide a full grain to
glass experience for visitors. – We saw the opportunity
with the farm and it tells the
story, you can see the whole cycle of where the
raw ingredients come from, in the field, and
how they make their way through the
production process, to the final bottle that
you’re tasting and enjoying. – This holistic
perspective has been taken to a whole new
level with the breweries latest venture, a fish farm that feeds off of
brewery bi-products. Invented by biologist
Jerry Northrup, this installation serves
as a proof of concept for a system that could work
at breweries everywhere. So I was really
excited about getting an exclusive sneak peak
to round out my visit. – This is it, this is the
Timberfish Installation. – I gotta tell ya, I’ve never
seen anything like this. So we’re about 30, 40
yards from the brewery, and you’ve got
waste water coming out of there, why
do fish like this? – Well fish are going
to eat things like worms and snails and
larvae, those things they’re gonna eat microbes, we
take the spent grain and these wood chips, and
create food for the microbes. – So you’re turning
all of this spent grain and spent water into
something that microbes love, and then the worms
love those microbes, and the fish loves the worms? – Exactly, you know we
have a clean water stream at the end, and
we’re also ending up with wood pelt at
the end that you could turn into a fuel source. – We’ve met people who
are trying to minimize waste water in breweries,
we’ve met people who are feeding the
spent grain to cattle, now you can actually
turn it into 10’s of thousands
of fish a year. I cannot wait to come
back here and eat fish that have been grown here,
what will I be eating? – Trout, catfish, char,
that’s gonna maybe be paired really well
with rye pale ale, the rye was grown on the farm, and the spent
grain fed the fish. So it’s really kind
of closing the loop and making a sustainable effort. – I’m like on cloud
nine about this, this is so cool, I love it. – All right,
fantastic, we’re glad you’re able to make it out. – There’s so much more
to see and explore, but that’s the time we
have for this episode. – To learn more about
the breweries in Chautauqua-Allegheny, and
throughout New York State, – Follow us on social
media or visit us on our website at
brewedinnewyorkshow.com – See ya next time! (mid tempo rock music)

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