Brewed in New York – Finger Lakes Full Episode

Brewed in New York – Finger Lakes Full Episode


– [Maya] The Finger
Lakes region, it’s not just for wine anymore. Breweries are making
a name for themselves throughout this
area of New York, and we’re going to show
you what the new face of craft beverage looks
like in the country, in the city, and on the water, on this episode of
Brewed in New York. Discover even more local
foods and beverages at Taste New York locations
throughout the state. Whether you’re at a
state park, sporting event, or stopping at one of our
New York welcome centers, it’s never been easier
to choose local and buy New York. Unalam, a family owned business
in upstate New York serving the building industry
for over a century. You can spot Unalam’s finely
crafted timber products in breweries throughout New York
State and beyond. Learn more at unalam.com 1886 Malt House proudly partnering with
New York’s finest grain growers to produce locally sourced,
high quality malt. for farm and craft breweries. The Northeast Hop Alliance Farmers, brewers,
and educators working together to
provide high quality, locally grown hops
to craft beer consumers in New York and
the Northeast. (rock music) – 9,000 square miles
and 14 counties make up the official Finger
Lakes region of New York state. – And while we’ll be making
our way down to wine country, we’re gonna start this episode
a little further North. – Syracuse is the Finger
Lakes’ largest urban center, perhaps known best to tourists as the host of the Great
New York State Fair. – [Matt] This 12-day
showcase of agriculture, entertainment and technology has been a part of summer
in New York since 1841, and now draws over a
million visitors each year. – But if you can’t
make it for the fair, there are several
breweries in the area that you can visit
in any season. One of them has been
blazing the trail for all New York State
brewers for decades. (bluegrass music) – New York is known
as The Empire State. A nickname to reference
its abundant resources. It appears everywhere,
from iconic buildings to license plates,
and even on a brewery that has built a small
empire of its own. Welcome to the brand new
Empire Farmstead Brewery, a 40,000 square foot facility located on 22 acres of farmland
about 20 miles from Syracuse in the town of Cazenovia. We’re visiting just before the official grand opening in 2016, but they’re already producing
beer in this facility, and you can still smell
the aroma of lumber mixing with fresh malt and hops. I’m here to meet
with David Katleski, the founder and President. The journey to where we stand
today didn’t happen overnight. It actually began
over 20 years ago, when David was working with
a shopping mall developer in Syracuse. – So, in a nutshell,
tell me about how you started and
founded Empire Brewing. – My college
roommate once told me that if I ever wanted to open
a restaurant, let him know, and I fell in love with Syracuse and thought that downtown
needed a little shot in the arm. So I called my college roommate, and ironically he was at
the Northampton Brew Pub, and he’s like, dude, there’s
this concept called a brewpub, where we could like make
beer and have the restaurant at the same time,
and I was like, that sounds awesome,
let’s do it. So that’s where it all came
together, and that was 1992, and we set out to be one of
the first craft breweries in New York State. We chose Armory
Square in Syracuse, because the basement rent
was three bucks a square foot and that’s all we could afford. – [Matt] The original
Empire Brew Pub in Syracuse is still there, and has
operated continuously since it first opened. The casual atmosphere
is enhanced by the cozy, tucked
away feeling. The brewing facility
is housed in glass, to provide patrons with a
view of their beer being born, and this restaurant
knows how to pair the best of local brew,
with the best of local fare. – If anyone were to ask
us, any of the menu items, we would know what
to pair with it. Like an IPA is good at
cutting something spicy down. The amber ale is
really good with pizza, complimenting like an
Italian type flavor. The White Aphro would
be good with desserts. I think people are drawn to
our locally sourced beer, also we have a lot
of Louisiana-style
Southern Cuisine. I like our really
funky flavored beers. Like, I like our Local Grind,
it’s flavored with coffee. I like the Deep Purple,
flavored with Concord grapes. You can see the
eat where you live right above our stairs, so
that’s a huge thing for us. We like to incorporate as
much local produce, meats, distilleries as possible. – Empire now is known
for using fresh, locally-sourced ingredients. Was that always a
part of the business right from the beginning? – It wasn’t until 2007, we did a carbon footprint
analysis of our food and determined that the
average piece of food on the plate that a
customer was eating had traveled 3,000 miles,
and it blew me away. – [Matt] The average. – Yes, one of the
reasons why we chose this Farmstead location, is
directly across the street is a beef farmer. Part of the deal here is that
all of our spent grains now, go directly across the
street to feed his cattle. Now that’s going to
obviously save him on feed over the course of the year. We’re going to produce
100 tons or whatever of spent grain, and he’ll
go and feed his cattle. That’s pretty cool. – [Matt] It’s this kind
of progressive thinking that has earned
David a reputation as something of a visionary
in the craft beer industry. Just consider a quick
list of his achievements. He started a brew pub
before the idea really even caught on in New York, and
Empire was the first company, not just the first brewery, to use 100% New York
produced renewable energy. And back when David was
one of only a handful of craft brewers trying
to scratch out a living in a world dominated by
big domestic producers and foreign imports, he founded the New York State
Brewers Association, an organization that promotes
all New York state brewers. And now, Empire has expanded
from the basement brew pub producing about 800
barrels of beer a year, to the new facility, that
has its sights set on all of New York and beyond. – We’re standing here in the
new facility on the farmstead, it’s gorgeous and it’s huge. You’ve been with the
company for how long? – Nine years now
with Empire, yeah. – This is a big change of
pace from the old spot. – It really is,
I mean, you know, the old spot is a seven
barrel brew pub system that had been there for 20
years, and this is obviously a more state-of-the-art, a
much longer 60 barrel system that we have here. – I love how people
sitting at the bar are facing the bottling line. I saw the bottling
machine going earlier, and it takes several
people working it but there’s a lot
of automation, too, and the bottles are
being rinsed, and filled, and labeled, all automatically. – Yeah, and you know,
part of the concept behind being able to
see in the brew house, is, if you’ve been to the
original brew pub in Syracuse, the brewery is right there. Open glass, you can see in
what’s going on there so we, even though this is much larger, we wanted to carry that
experience over here, and when people come in,
if we’re out here workin’, they can take a peek and
see what we’re doing. – Right now, there’s a
lot of tanks in here, but there’s also a
lot of open space. And so you’re telling me that
the idea is to expand this and really fill up the
warehouse with more fermenters. – Yeah, we designed
the place for expansion so we could grow our barrelage without having to
add to the building. So everything that we bought, our boiler, our hot water
tanks, our air compressors, all that stuff is sized to
get to 100,000 barrels a year. – I saw on social media today, pictures of your new
bottles on shelves at grocery stores
around the state. – I don’t have any children,
but I said to people, now I think I know what
it’s like to have a kid, because that was like my baby
being born and going out to the world. So yeah, that was
pretty exciting. I actually went last night
and bought a six pack, just for the experience
of doing that, it was kinda cool. – Amazing. Congratulations on that. – Thanks, man, I
appreciate that. – So the distribution of
your beer has also grown, and now you’re even
taking it overseas. – Never in my wildest
dreams did I ever think that we were going to be
shipping beer to China. – [Matt] But they are, as one of just a few craft
brewers doing so. It all came together
when David had a once-in-a-lifetime
opportunity to go to China with a group of
business professionals put together by New York State. – We happened to go to
this amazing company called Jing Wei Fu Tea
which is in Shaanxi, which is central China. And Mr. Ji, who is the
owner of the company and I hit it off. He said, you should
make a beer with my tea. And I said, that sounds great. And we had determined that
we were born 31 days apart, in the year of the
dragon, and I said, well, we’ll call it Two Dragons. China is about 25 years behind where the U.S. is in
terms of craft beer. The difference between
China and the U.S. is China moves much faster. When they see something
that’s cool or Western, it can explode. So I believe in the
next five years, they’re going to catch up to us in terms of popularity
for craft beer. – David went so far as
to hire export specialist Jing Zhang, in order to help him better understand
the Chinese market. She saw an opportunity for
Empire’s unique collaboration in creating Two Dragons to
help promote understanding between the U.S. and China. – Beer is just such a
non-political thing, that everybody can enjoy, and because of the
Two Dragons blending with the two cultures so
well, in a bottle of beer, that can be an
awesome bridge that we can set up for
the two countries. When people drink a beer,
especially craft beer, they wanna know the
story behind it. And that’s the key for
the two different cultures to blend in together. – Empire has had
some amazing growth. I mean, we’re sitting
here at this beautiful farmstead brewery. It’s an exciting
time for the company. – It’s exciting, it really is. When I could’ve just sat
back and enjoyed the success of our brew pub, with
a name like Empire, and the reputation of our brand, and the amount of
awards that we won, it, to me, only made sense that we took it
to the next level. – Well, keep those
good ideas coming. – Thanks. (saxophone music) – At Brewed in New York,
it’s clear we appreciate finely crafted beverages. There are so many styles
of beer out there to try, but please remember to
always drink responsibly. When you visit a brewery,
appoint a designated driver or use public transportation. Never drink and drive. – Heading southwest
from Syracuse, you end up in the heart of
New York’s wine country, in an area known as
the Finger Lakes. This series of 11 narrow lakes was carved out by glaciers
two million years ago. And today, those deep
waters feed hundreds of vineyards along their shores. And while the area is
a grape destination for red and white lovers alike, beer tourists have
started making their way down the beverage
trail, as well. On the southern
tip of Seneca Lake, you’ll find the town
of Watkins Glen. This hamlet is known as
a destination for both nature lovers and those
with a thirst for speed. Watkins Glen is home to
an historic racetrack that now brings NASCAR
to the area each summer, and a state park that was
voted the best in the nation, with a series of trails
and cascading waterfalls you won’t find anywhere else. After a long day on the
trails or at the track, stop by the nearby
village of Hector, and visit the new kids in town, at Two Goats Brewing. – I’m Jon Rodgers, and I brew
beer at Two Goats Brewing. Well, our story was following
our passion, our dream. I guess it materialized
in Hector, New York, on beautiful Seneca Lake. – People come to this
region for the wineries and for the lakes. It’s great for us to
be in the wine country. Most of our friends
that live here work in the wine industry. There’s actually a
saying, to make great wine you have to drink beer. – The name Two Goats came
from a German variety of beer called Doppelbock. And loosely translated,
it’s double goat. A lot of times times you’ll
see bock beers depicted with a goat on it’s
label, because that’s a bock. – So you can see the
goats on the tap handles. Our front door has
a goat, you know, goats are fun, so it’s
a fun marketing idea. – Doppelbock has a tendency
to be malt-forward, they’re a little higher
octane, a little higher ABV, the bodies are a little richer, a little more viscous
on the palate, so it will have a little
sweetness, light in hop. Compelling and rich. My inspiration for brewing
stems from my passion for food and cooking and
being in the kitchen, and beer to me, is
fermented barley soup. The most popular varieties
tend to be the IPAs. We brew three pales, the
Goatmaster Ultra Pale, Goat Sol Session
IPA, and our X-IPA which is our continually
evolving experiment IPA. – The only food that we
serve is beef on weck, which is a roast beef
sandwich on kimmelweck roll. It’s popular in Buffalo,
that’s where it originates. So anyone from Buffalo
knows about it. Almost everyone else
outside of Buffalo has never heard of it. – My mom and dad are both
from Western New York. As a kid, growing
up, beef on weck was commonly the main course
at all of our family functions. Then I wanna incorporate
family into our business, that was just a
no-brainer for us, and it’s worked great. People really do come
for the sandwich. They are delicious. I think my record
is 13 in a week. – So, the building
is from the 1800s, the barn originally was
four miles up the road, so we took it down
piece by piece and then put it back
up in this location. The old barnwood
is on the inside, and then there’s new
wood on the outside. – The interior to the building definitely speaks of the
region, the hand-hewn beams, the materials came from here, and obviously are still here. If I have anything
to say about it, it’ll be around for 150 more for the next
generation to enjoy. – We heard that there were
some wild parties in the barn, and it definitely has
a reputation of being a very social place. And we actually feel
like that is in the wood, because there’s a good feel here and I don’t think it’s
all just what we’ve done, I think the barnwood
actually contributes to that. The building is 700 square feet, and then we have the
brewery underneath. In the summer, when we have
our major tourist season, we can have a lot
more people here because of the decks. In the winter, we’re not
all that busy anyway, so it ends up being very cozy
in here, and comfortable. When you look up, you’ll
notice dollar bills all over the ceiling, and
that started the first year that we were open,
a customer asked us if we wanted to see
a cool bar trick. So he said, get me a dollar, he put a tack in the
center of the dollar bill, put a 50 cent piece
behind the tack, and then underhand threw it up. The 50 cent piece pushes
the tack into the ceiling, and it falls back down. Now the bartenders do it. I guess it was about
two and a half years ago we decided to donate them. We ended up donating $5,400
to local environmental funds that help protect the water. – I mean, just look around and you realize what we have
here in the Finger Lakes. When we started two
goats, the idea was the business has to live
and grow within its means. With that in mind, we
incorporated solar power. We produce about 90% of
our own energy on site, we also use geothermal
technology for
heating and cooling, our leftover grain is
fed to livestock. – We kind of lucked
out with the view. I realize that when you Google
Two Goats Brewing images, you get mostly the view. (laughing) So, I thought, you
know we should do
something fun with that and have people come here
and purposely take pictures. – I’ve seen 100 pictures
taken off this deck and I never get sick of it, because they all tell just
a little different story each and every time,
and I love the fact that you can see something
completely different through someone else’s
eyes, not just your own. Each and every day, and
people remind us of that, when they send us their photos, and share their
good times with us, and introduce us to
their friends and family that are coming back
again and again. It’s great to be a part of that. The best part of Two Goats
is to be able to exist in a region that truly
appreciates the art of craft. (bell ringing) – Craft 101. Chances are, if
you’ve ordered a beer at any bar in the country,
you’ve seen one of these. The classic shaker pint. As the name suggests, the
shaker pint was originally used in bars for making mixed drinks, but when was the last time
you shook a beer on purpose? Let’s talk glassware. Bars and restaurants
love shaker pints because the flat sides make
them easy to clean and stack. But the shape of this
glass does very little to help deliver the aroma of that finely crafted
beer in your hand, oh yeah, and the longer
that you hold one, the more your hand
warms your beer. Mm, very refreshing. Fortunately, many
craft breweries know that there’s life
beyond the shaker pint. In fact, the shape of a
glass can really influence your beer-tasting experience. And there’s a whole
range of glasses that have been designed
to enhance the qualities of different styles. Take the Pilsner glass. Its tall and slender
shape showcases the color of lighter beers, and actually
aids in the carbonation of these bubbly styles. The Weisen glass looks similar, but tapers in at the top. Weisen is German for wheat, and a curved lip on
the top of this glass is designed to trap and
maintain a thick foam head, along with all the aroma
found in German wheat beers. If you’re drinking a more
complex Belgian beer, or a fuller bodied
IPA, you’re best off with a Tulip or a
Snifter shape glass, which helps trap the
flavorful hop oils and spices underneath the head,
but still gives you plenty of room to get
your nose in there and really take in the aroma. Plus, the stem keeps your
warm hand off the goods. Now, we’re talking. So when you visit
a craft brewery, look at the specialty glassware, and notice how they’re used
to complement certain styles. But don’t get too
upset if your next beer shows up in one of these. After all, it’s still
got craft beer inside it. (rock music) – Craft brewers love to
draw their inspiration from the places they call home. And that’s true in the
small town of Auburn where a new brew pub
has taken its cue from an unexpected source. If you’re doing a
little time here, please be sure to check
out Prison City Brewing. You may not think the
big house and beer naturally go together,
but brew pub founder Dawn Schulz and husband Marc, wanted to pay homage to the
city’s most prominent feature. Dawn is one of the
small, but growing number of female brew pub
owners across the state. And she invited me to
discuss how she broke in to the business. First of all, this is the
first time I’ve been to Auburn, it is absolutely beautiful. What drew you here, and
to open a business here? – When I was
leaving high school, I swore I was never coming back, but after college and then
being away for 15 years and starting a family, I
wanted to move back to the area because my family is here. I love Auburn, the
community is amazing, the lakes are gorgeous, and
it just seemed like home to be back here. I always have had a
passion for craft beer, so it seemed like the right time and the right fit
to open a brew pub. – And why the name? – Auburn has the
nickname Prison City. It is the home of Auburn
Correctional Facility which is a federal prison. Which is kind of famous, it’s
the first electric chair, so there’s some neat history
behind the prison itself, and we just thought it fit. A lot of the photos on the
wall are historic photos of the prison. – [Maya] I love that. – We hired a design firm, and
they came up with the logo, which is a lock with the
pilsner glass inside of it. – It’s clear that Prison City
takes its theme seriously. Albeit, a little
tongue in cheek. Right down to the
names of the beers. Dawn’s husband Marc, in
addition to being co-owner, is also known as the name guy. – I am the name guy. I think beer is meant
to be fun, it is art, and it should be handcrafted,
but it should be fun. So coming up with names
like Cool Hand Cuke, lotta movie references. We’re just always
looking for things, and especially if it
piques somebody’s interest, like they’re like “aha, I
know why you named that beer,” and it gets people engaged
and creates a conversation. – Dawn and Marc have even put their own prison-themed spin on a popular brew pub activity. I can see behind me here,
we have some mugshots. I assume that’s not
from the prison. (laughing) – Not that I know of, some of them might
have other mugshots. Most breweries tend
to do a mug club, where it’s discounted
pints or things like that, but being prison themed,
we have a mugshot wall, so everybody gets
their picture taken, we try to do different
tastings each month, whether they be blind
tasting, beer trivia, my husband will come
in and teach people about different hops
or different yeast, different styles of beer. That’s actually
one of the reasons that I love the brew pub model, because I feel like
we’re the front line to introducing people to
craft beer, and it’s been fun. – And that combination
of fun and serious craft extends across the business. It’s what attracted brewer
Ben Maeso to Prison City. Ben doesn’t lock himself into
a particular style of brewing. – I started out as being
a traditional brewer in terms of the types
of beers I made, and then, as soon as I
kinda figured that all out I enjoy to be challenged. I like to make lagers, I
enjoy making wild beer, sour ales, you know,
especially sour beers tend to be very unpredictable. Working with Dawn
has been great, she pretty much gives
me carte blanche as far as the brewery goes, which is amazing, because I
don’t have any restraints, I can do whatever I want. I can put cereal in beer,
I can put weird fruits and different
ingredients in beer. We produce just about
250 barrels a year, which is really small in
the grand scheme of things, but on the other
hand, it’s great, because we get to
experiment a lot with all these small batches. We get to have a lot of fun. If we were in a big
production brewery, we’d probably have to make
the same four flagship beers all the time, so,
we enjoy the fact that it’s small and I get
to keep being creative in my process. We have one beer
called Puff Puff Shiv, which is an English
style Brown Ale made with actual
Cocoa Puff cereal, so cleaned out a couple stores
of all their Cocoa Puffs, added it to the beer, we really didn’t know
what was gonna happen, ended up tasting and smelling
exactly like Cocoa Puffs, and everybody loved
it, especially those
that love chocolate those that love dark beers. – I originally didn’t think that I would ever
hire a home-brewer, but he was voted New York
state home-brewer of the year, he has hundreds of awards. – I came up for my interview, and I brought ten of
my best homebrews, brought my own glassware. I think having the
right glasses is crucial to the beer. A lot of bars serve out
of those old shaker pints, and it’s probably one
of the worst things that you can drink out of. I’m a glass geek in addition
to being a beer geek. – Before the end
of the interview, I already knew what
was gonna happen. I knew he was the guy. It was a great fit. – Being a female pub owner, are you in a unique
club, and if you are, do you consider
yourself a trailblazer? – I think that there
are trailblazers that have come before me,
but I certainly do think that we’re a minority
in the business. I am a member of the
Pink Boots Society, who has probably
blazed the trail. They’ve been around
for quite a while, and it is a women’s organization that is set up to try to
introduce women to craft beer and they do a lot of
education and scholarships for women to get into
the brewing industry. Girls Pint Out is
a group of women that I’ve put together
in the Auburn area to try to create a craft
beer community for women. – I would love to know if you
have any advice for anybody, but women in particular, for
starting a brew pub business. – As a woman, I would
say, just go for it. I sat on a panel of women
in the industry one time, and one of the big things
that came out of it is women were intimidated to
be able to speak about beer, because they felt that
they didn’t know enough. And my advice is, you really do. If you’re drinking it,
you’re already halfway there. But, really, in general,
the craft beer community is all-embracing, and I’ve
had great relationships with men and women. This community
wants to help you. Don’t be afraid
to ask questions. – Did you get a chance to try
that chocolate cereal beer? – Uh, the Puff Puff
Shiv, I sure did, and it’s truly one of a kind. Although, if you
love IPAs like I do, they have an
award-winning IPA as well. – Nice, and you can learn
more about these stories, as well as other
popular breweries throughout the
Finger Lake region, at our website, brewed
in new york show dot com. – There, you’ll also
find information about New York State tourism,
as well as full episodes. – Thanks so much for joining us, we’ll see you next time
on Brewed in New York. (rock music)

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