Brewed in New York – The Culinary Institute of America Segment

Brewed in New York – The Culinary Institute of America Segment


– We’re the premier culinary
college in the country, we’ve been described as the
Harvard of cooking schools. We’ve changed with the times, because the business
has changed, the world has changed
a lot of obviously, we’ve always tried to lead,
rather than work from behind and by adding more
specializations, more different types of courses, we’re trying to remain the
premier culinary college. – The school has been
developing new programs, growing it into a full
service culinary college, we do have a beverage
specialization for a Bachelors program, where
students get to learn more about wines, spirits and
mixology and beverage service, but there was not a ton of
beer education going on, so a chance to actually put
in an operating brewery, that would function
as a business just like our restaurants
was pretty cool. But this brewery was
built in partnership with Brooklyn Brewery,
who helped design the brew house itself, donated
and supplied the brewery and helped design the
curriculum for the class. – Initially it was just gonna be a three-barrel, sort of
experimentational brewery and then our Director
of Food and Beverage said, “No, we’re
gonna do this bigger, “we’re gonna sell beer, “we’re gonna make
beer and sell beer,” and that’s when we decided
on a seven-barrel system, it became a lot bigger than
we expected it to be at first, we’re really happy
with where we are now and we’re lucky enough
to bring Hutch on to be our head brewer. – It is a brewing
class, not a beer class, so it’s not just beer
history and appreciation, we can cover that
in other classes, so it is more about operations
and how beer is made and the operations
of running a brewery. – In some ways , beer
is harder than wine, squished grapes turns into wine, beer takes a lot more
work and a lot more steps, but that also gives us more
opportunity to make decisions, so we have more control over
what we’re gonna be making and when the students
start seeing this, they really do enjoy it. – So we get students
from all the different Bachelors programs in here, we get culinary
science students, we get students on our
entrepreneurship program, which is cool for me,
because it makes for better, more interesting
conversations, you know, culinary science students love
to talk about fermentation and what’s going on and how
the yeast is producing flavors and how we’re controlling that, the entrepreneurship students
are more business focused, so we talk about
efficiency and making money and all those things that go
into an operating business. – Having Hutch as an instructor is just a really terrific thing, getting someone that’s been
in the industry for a while and is able to give you the
connections that you need and tell you what
it’s actually like. It’s one thing to conceptualize
and talk about the theory, but to be able to know
what it’s been like brewing in the industry and what it’s like to
actually have things sell and get that
perspective from someone that’s been doing it for a
while is really important. – This class is
surprisingly very difficult, heavy on the science, it’s
a lot of memorizations, but the hands on is like, I didn’t know how
hands on we would be, like we’re filtering
beer right now, like that’s something I never
thought I would be able to do, so that’s one of the challenges. – In the class, I’ll teach them
about alpha and beta amylase and the different mashing
temperatures for them. In the brewery with Hutch,
they practically carry out the steps that depend
on organic chemistry, so we give them both. They are learning the
information and then applying it in the lab and I think
it’s a great combo. – We have two beers
we do year round, Cleaver IPA, which
is an American IPA, you know, from today’s modern
standard of the juicy
New England IPA, it’s not fruit forward, but
compared to classic IPA, it’s a pretty fruit
forward and hop flavor, very little bitterness. So we brewed that
beer specifically, knowing it would be on tap
in all of our restaurants and then we have a Wit
beer, Belgian style wheat, it’s a good beer to pair with, it’s a nice
juxtaposition to the IPA, so we do a beer called
Mise En Place Wit, we always have a
class project beer, that will be the gose,
that’ll be coming out. – Every semester we
have a class beer, you split into five groups and each of you get
an assigned style, this semester we
are brewing a gose, a German style, lightly
salted sour beer. – Most of the students,
when they come here think they’re going to
be a cook or a baker and they’re gonna have their
own restaurant or bake shop. Along the way,
they start finding that there are other things
to do in our business and beverage is a very
attractive one, I think, specifically because
it’s the perfect hybrid between front of the house
and back of the house, ’cause in the kitchen, you’re working your
fingers to the bone and you never see the
people you’re feeding and in the front of the house, you don’t get to make anything, if you’re just a
service manager, whereas in beverage,
you’re doing, you’re still
involved with flavor, you’re still involved
with purchasing and you’re also working
with people and selling, so you get the best
of both worlds. – This class is preparing me for just like a general
knowledge of beer itself. When I work in a front of house, there’s probably
gonna be a beer menu and I’m gonna need to
explain to customers the difference in those beers, whether it’s a pilsner or
a lager, sour beers, etc. just to have like
a general knowledge of how the different beers taste and what they want as like
a personal preferences. – You know, I’ve been a
brewer for a long time, this is a really fun and
exciting environment, there’s a lot of energy here,
a lot of buzz on campus, there’s a lot of very smart,
creative, excited students. It’s a really exciting time
to be part of craft beer in New York, I think we have
more growth ahead of us, 10 years ago, 15 years
ago, we had to teach people what a brown ale was
and what a porter was and what IPA was, but
now we have to get them to teach ’em about
New York beer, that they need to be drinking, not just using
their local dollars to spend in their local towns, but supporting New
York breweries, you don’t need to
buy beer from Oregon, you don’t need to buy
beer from California, like we have the
great beer here, people just have to get
out there and try it. (upbeat music)

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