Chemistry of Beer – Unit 1 – Brewmasters’ Corner: Brewing Overview I

Chemistry of Beer – Unit 1 – Brewmasters’ Corner: Brewing Overview I


>>Mark Carter: I’m Mark Carter, I’ve worked
here for ten years—thirteen years. I’ve been here and I just got lucky. I went and
did an apprenticeship under an old brewer and got lucky.>>Charles Stout: My name is Charles Stout—worked
at the Bricktown Brewery since it opened. Started as an employee, worked my way up through
management. Actually brewed for a little bit. Was an assistant brewer. I’ve worked here
long enough that they’ve given me a piece of the business, and I love working in the
beverage industry, specifically brewing beer and selling beer. What distinguishes a beer
from other drinks? You know, obviously it’s got alcohol in it, beer is fuller, beer is
carbonated. It’s different from other alcoholic beverages. You get a wide variety of styles
of beer that give you a chance to explore that beverage. You know, whereas vodkas are
vodkas, Scotches are Scotches, sodas are sodas, beer—you know there’s such a wonderful gamut
from sweet, to sour, to sweet and sour, to heavy, to chocolaty. You know, all those different
qualities that beer gives you. And I think that that’s what makes it very popular, is
that you got a—get a—chance to find your own niche, flavor of beer.>>Carter: We have a couple of guys that come
down, help us out. I have an assistant in there. We get in there, we look at our board
for the week, deciding what we’re brewing, getting our recipe together. You know every
beer we have is—has different ingredients in it. We have—you know, we’ll say our—our
red is a true English red ale, so we use English malts, we use a English crystal or a English
caramel malt to produce our red. So the malts for that are all English. They’re bigger kernels
almost, as opposed to some of the American pale malts, the English pale malts seem to
be a bit bigger. Produces a very drinkable beer. Different recipes again, you know, stout
recipe has—it seems like—ten to twelve different grains in it, so it’s pretty big.
The overview of brew-brewing process starts, you know, again, coming in, finding out what
we’re gonna brew for the day. We come in, we get our grain, we select it downstairs.
We take our grain and put it into a mill downstairs, and it cracks it for us. So we bring it up
through a elevator into our mash tun. Which our mash tun is actually a mash tun/lauter
tun—it’s, it’s made for lautering, so we can do that process all in one tank. Mash
it in with hot water. Once we let it set for a while, I mean, I can give you times; you
know we let ours set for—I mean, these days, your grains are made for—for brewing, so
you can actually get your conversions in about 15 to 30 minutes these days with your, your
grain. We do a 90-minute rest. We still do that just so we can kinda get ahead of the
day and, and, and filter in our beer. And so and you know once the brew starts, the
cleaning starts. You know the brew part is the selecting of the grain and the mashing
of it. And then the rest of it’s janitorial work until your beer’s, you know, ready to
go over into a kettle and be boiled. That’s when hops are added. That’s when, you know,
the balance of the, you know, the hops balance out the sweetness of the, the wort in there.
Aand after that, we move it through some pipes, oxygenate it, throw it into a fermentation
vessel with some yeast, and, with good luck, we have beer in about ten days.>>Stout: That’s where the magic happens. Is
in the fermentation vessel.>>Carter: That’s right. It’s all about the
fermentation. It’s all about the fermentation.

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