Cooking Field to Table with Luke Zahm — Wild Wisconsin 2019

Cooking Field to Table with Luke Zahm — Wild Wisconsin 2019


[Intro music plays] Well Lauren, here we are on our sixth and
final segment Wild Wisconsin. And one of my favorites too, cooking wild game
with the DNR’s Jeff Pritzl and chef Luke Zahm from Wisconsin Foodie. Hungry?
Always, let’s get to it. [Music plays] Hey, I’m Luke Zahm. I’m host of Wisconsin
foodie on PBS and today I have a very special guest, Mr. Jeff Pritzel from the
Wisconsin DNR. Welcome! It is a pleasure, Luke. So, we’re gonna do some things today
with venison that are a little bit different than a lot of us have kind of
grown up eating. How…what do you usually do with venison at your house? Venison.
Three things happen in my house. It’s either steak on the grill, it’s ground meat
gets mixed in for tacos or spaghetti. Or we send some off to have brats and bacon
made so I’m looking forward to upping my game at home with a little more of this.
What we’re gonna do today is we’re gonna braise this. So, osso buco literally
translates in Italian to bone with a hole. And usually, we would take the cross
section, with like the femur intact here. But this actually is gonna work out
really well, and it kind of quickens a little bit of the cooking time for us. We
want to get back out into the woods and this is gonna help us do just that. So,
first thing I want to do, Jeff, is I want to take this silver skin off. It’s gonna
make it super tight and stringy and really kind of unpleasant to eat. So, we
want to make sure that we take our time and get that off of there.
And I honestly think that this is something that a lot of hunters and
cooks at home probably don’t take quite enough time with. When they eat it and
say like, ‘oh, I hate that flavor,’ a lot of what they’re getting is this connective
tissue, which makes it a little bit tough. So, you know, trying to take this off
without taking a lot of the meat. So, we have these shank pieces here, and we’re
gonna take some gingersnaps today, right? And I’m gonna take a little handful of
these. I’m gonna put them on my cutting board and I’m just gonna bust them up a
little bit. And I think you’re gonna be pleasantly surprised if you followed
this verbatim. But, I think Luke, that’s what’s become attractive to a
whole host of Wisconsinites that that maybe didn’t grow up hunting, but
this actual the food attraction is what’s bringing people out into the
field to collect their venison. And then have the experience, to do something like
this is … is really growing and it’s great for us to see that as new people get
exposed to the opportunities and the experiences. This all has a story and
that’s exactly the type of food we strive to cook here at the cafe, and it’s
what makes our culture so rich and proud. So I’m gonna take these … these gingersnap
crumbs. I kind of mash them into a pulp, you saw that with the side of my knife.
We’re gonna get those in here and we’re gonna start dredging this up. I’m gonna
hit it with a little bit of salt and black pepper too.
What we want to do next Jeff I think is is create the element for the braising
liquid. And that for me is gonna equate to some tomatoes. I have some Jimmy Nardello peppers. I have some onions, a little bit of carrot and, you know, I have
some mushrooms here too that I think would be really great in this braise.
We’ll put that in the pan, brown it up with some of this venison and then
deglaze it with red wine and kind of let her rip, how does that sound? That’s
awesome. [Music plays] We want to start this out by adding just a little bit of olive oil. All right, so I can see this coming up now, I can
see that smoke and I’m just gonna gently lay these in. While we’re browning this, I
want to make sure that this is complemented with something that’s also
indigenous to Wisconsin and delicious, so I think what I’d like to do is put
together a quick wild rice risotto. And this comes to us from the Ojibwe nation. [Sizzles] I’m gonna turn it up to about a medium
heat. What I want to do is I want to toast that wild rice for just a minute.
Let’s check our venison. So what we’re doing is we’re making sure
that this is nicely brown. So I’m gonna give these a nice flip. Over here, I can
smell this posting up and it’s rich and nutty. I have stock. This is a combination
of beef and pork stock that we put together at the cafe, but I’m literally
just gonna pour this on this wild rice. Now that the venison is nicely browned
on both sides, I’m gonna remove it from the pan quickly. One of the things that I
definitely want to do is let it kind of cook down a bit. But this is the part for
all of our aromatics and other ingredients that we prepared on the
table go into the pot. And this to me smells like a memory. Anytime I get
onions and garlic in a pan and a little bit of tomato in there with a little bit
of that venison, this is like eating something directly from my childhood
pages. So, I’m gonna hit it with just a little bit of red wine. You’re gonna add
just a little bit more of that stock. We’re gonna take our venison and we’re
gonna place this right back in here in this braising liquid. So this venison has been braising for a
while now. I think I’m about ready because I can’t wait any longer. So what
I have here these are some red curly mustard greens. We’re gonna come back
with this wild rice. Again, this is some long grain wild rice.
We’ve just adorned this with a little bit of heavy cream, that stock, salt, black
pepper. We’re gonna come back with our braised venison. Oh, that’s that’s the
piece right there. Let’s throw a little bit of freshly grated cheese on here. Is
this looking OK? It’s looking better and better. And then gremolata and this
is simply parsley, lemon and orange zest, garlic and I put a little bit of smoked
trout in here. Just to kind of give it some richness and some body. And we put
olive oil with it. And I got a feeling you’re just about to take the word Wild
Wisconsin and give it … we’re putting a new definition on Wild Wisconsin.
Have you ever tried a nasturtium? I have not. Well I’m gonna make you try it. So, like
an assertion when people come and they eat the food here, a lot of times I see
them push these to the side and I honestly think that these are the stars
of the plate. I think it’s a wonderful way to kind of accent the dish. It’s
beautiful, and again, it’s… it’s another story in the chapter of us. Jeff,
bon appetit, huh? Thanks Luke. Thanks for bringing your skills to Wild Wisconsin.
Thanks a lot. Thanks for having me. You bet. Well that looked tasty. I can’t wait to
get in the field and put some venison in the freezer. Me too. Well Lauren, this has
been a great season of Wild Wisconsin and I hope all of you enjoyed it as much as
we did. Thanks for hanging out with Aaron and me, and hope to see you again for
season number four of Wild Wisconsin. [Closing music]

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