Employable Me Digital Exclusive: Amsterdam Brewery

Employable Me Digital Exclusive: Amsterdam Brewery


♪ So my name’s Chel,
I work for Amsterdam Brewery in the human resources
department. Amsterdam Brewery has
been around for 31 years. We are a craft beer manufacturer
located in downtown Toronto. ♪ When we are hiring
someone here at Amsterdam, we look for energy and passion
as the number one thing. People that want to work in beer
is a big contributing factor to anyone that
we hire for any department. Second to that would be,
I’d say technical abilities, interpersonal skills and
I think the number one thing we look for is energy,
excitement and passion is a big thing in
the brewing industry. We’ve hired and we currently
have several people working here with various types
of disabilities umm, some a neurological,
some are physical disabilities. ♪ We followed
the A.O.D.A which is the accessibilities for
Ontarians with disabilities act and what that means
is that anytime we post a job, we actually put on
the posting that we welcome and encourage
people with disabilities to apply for our jobs and if
they do require any assistance during the interview,
a recruitment process we’re happy to provide
that assistance. So for me what that’s looked
like in the past has been, an enlarged job application,
putting information on a projector
or a big screen if someone has
a visual disability. Sometimes it could include
bringing in an interpreter or a seeing-eye dog,
service animals and sometimes it’s
just as simple as talking slowly
and writing things down. Cruiser umm– There’s a role
for everyone in the world and I think it’s
important to recognize if you have a disability,
it doesn’t mean that you’re not valuable
to the workforce, it doesn’t mean that there’s not
a great job out there for you. Just because
they have a disability it doesn’t mean
that they can’t do something, it just means that
you have to approach it from a slightly
different perspective. If you know what their
disability is you can work around that,
you can work with the employee to highlight what their
skills and competencies are. And I think it’s important
to make sure that if you know someone
has a disability that you’re not setting
them up for failure, that you’re giving them
duties and responsibilities that they can
and will accomplish. Best advice I can give to
someone with a disability is understand how you
can play to your strengths, so that you can
really sell yourself. If it’s ADHD
what you can say is, “I’m really energetic,
I’m really excite-ful, I bring a lot of energy
and passion to my job” and really play
on your key qualities, even if it means playing
on your disability a little bit to highlight what
you’re capable of. We have an employee
here who’s part of the Ontario Disability program,
which means that he does receive subsidy and
funding from the government because of
his disability. He’s an integral part of the
team, he’s loved by everyone and he’s like a little brother
to everyone out in production. We give him specific tasks that
we know he’s capable of doing. He’s at the end
of the bottle line taking bottles off the lines,
he’s packing boxes, he helps us clean up
at the end of the day and he is absolutely one
of our best employees that we have here because
he gets along with everyone so well and
everyone really and truly cares about him like
a family member. Anncr: An AMI
original production.

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