Grilling

Grilling


Music Music Music Are you looking for a healthy option for dinner tonight? Or any night? I’m Julie Gardner with Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service. And I’m here at the Texas Beef Council with Roger Hall who is going to share some great tips for cooking the perfect burger and steak every time. Right, well grilling is easy and it’s a great cooking method for the health conscious. You don’t have to add a lot of fat and calories to have a great-tasting meal. Well, you know Roger, our family cooks on a grill year round. We like it because it is healthy, plus the cleanup is very minimal. So we love to use the grill year round. Right. Let’s get started though. If someone didn’t know how to grill, where would they get started? First thing you gotta do is make sure you have a clean grill. So, what we’re going to do is turn our grill up as hot as it will go and take an old wire brush, knock off any of the fajitas you had last night or whatever. So, you take the wire brush, go up and down the grates, good to go. But, because clean is so important, the next step I want to do is actually take a yellow onion, cut it in half, and actually rub it up and down the grate. The acid in the onion is going to help clean it and give it that nonstick feel that we’re looking for. So, once you’ve covered the entire surface, you’re good to go. I have to tell you, the onion trick is a new one on me, but I’m sure that it’s easier on the grill grates than a grill brush or a grill brick would be. So, extending the lifetime. Absolutely, now, once we’ve got it clean, it’s time to dial in that temperature. A great trick that I like to do is what we call the 4 by 4 method or taking your hand and putting it about 4 inches above the heat source and trying to hold it there for 4 seconds. If you can hold it there for 4 seconds before having to pull it away, that’s going to equal medium heat or about 400 to 415 degrees. Two seconds, and it is way too hot. You’ll burn the outside and the inside won’t be ready. Now, if you can hold it there for 8 or 9 seconds, then you have a very expensive hand warmer. Well, you know one of the things that intimidates so many people is knowing when that grill is ready. So, using that 4 by 4 rule, that’s a perfect method to know when it’s ready. So our grill is clean, we’ve got it to the right temperature, I bet I know what comes next. Go get the steaks. OK. Great! All right, we’ve got a couple of steaks on the grill now seasoned with a little bit of salt and pepper. I’ll go ahead and get that one on. But, these are seasoned up, ready to go, it’s very important to only flip a steak or a burger one time. But, how do we know when they are ready to be flipped? Well, if you’ll look at this steak here, it’s got some condensation or pools of water that are building up on the top, so it’s time to start checking to see if it’s ready. So if you’ll lift it up and try to flip it, it ought to just release itself up off the grill. Perfect. It’s got a nice sear, some good grill marks, ready to go. Now what about this one? We’re seeing the pools of water on the other side too, so it’s time to start checking for doneness. The best way to do that is with a meat thermometer. Now what Julie is doing here, she is going insert this thermometer in through the side. That way we don’t get any of the heat from the grill that’s going to spoil that reading. So she’s going to check it, it’s an instant-read thermometer, so we give it 5 or 6 seconds, see what we’ve got. What temperature are you looking at? I’m at about 135. 135 degrees, perfect. Go ahead, pull it off, because the temperature is going to continue to rise in this steak for a few minutes. We want to let it rest so that the juices redistribute and it’s going to hit about 145 for a nice medium on that strip steak. Well, I don’t know about you, Roger, but these tips have really inspired me to want to grill for more than just dinner. Maybe lunch and even breakfast too. The next time you’re looking for a healthy recipe for your family, I hope you remember the Texas Beef Council as well as Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service.

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