How to Make Braised Chicken in Apple Cider

How to Make Braised Chicken in Apple Cider


[MUSIC PLAYING] Today we’re going to
go through the steps to making braised chicken. You can braise chicken,
meat, fish, vegetables. It’s all basically
the same technique. It’s just how long
you’re going to cook it for after you brown if off. So today we’re using chicken. And I have a whole chicken here
that I’ve cut up and deboned. Mostly the wings I
left the bones in. Then we’re going to show
you how do oblique carrots. And we’ll have celery, onions,
a little apple cider vinegar, some fresh, cold pressed
apple cider, some fresh thyme, bay leaves, and a little oil
and butter to cook it in. So let’s get started. So the first thing
we’re going to do is we’re going to
season our chicken. So a little fresh pepper. And some salt. So
when you season, you want to season up high
so it disperses evenly. And let’s do the other side. Now we’re going to start
heating up our pan. And when you saute,
you always want to get your pan hot
first before you add your oil and your butter. So that takes a minute or two. And while we’re
doing that, we’re going to dredge our
chicken in the flour. So for chicken and
fish, it’s a good idea to flour first, because that
helps give it a nice brown when you saute it off. Beef, pork, things like
that, not necessary, although flour will
help to make your sauce a little thicker as it cooks. To dredge it in the
flour, you simply– and then just knock
off any excess. So it’s getting hot now. So I’m going to add some oil. And you see the oil makes
rivulets across the pan. That means the pan
is nice and hot. And I’m going to add
some butter for flavor. [MUSIC PLAYING] Put it in– when you put
your food in the hot pan, you always want to put
it in away from you. And you want to put the
serving side down first. So the skin side is
the side you would serve facing up on
the plate, so you want to put that down first. So you want to have a little
space between your items. If you have too much
space, they tend to scorch. And if you’re too crowded in
your pan, instead of browning, they release their
juices and they boil, which can toughen the
product and not give you that nice brown coating. So while those brown, I’ll
finish flouring these. You don’t want to move it
around too much in the pan, because this is when you’re
getting that nice Maillard reaction, the caramelization
of the proteins. And the little bit of
carbohydrates in flour. [MUSIC PLAYING] So they’re not brown yet. So at this point,
we’re not trying to cook the chicken through. We’re simply browning it off. Once we’ve browned
it, we’re going to take it out of the pan. We’re going to cook our
vegetables, deglaze our pan, and then we’ll put the chicken
back in to finish cooking it. So that’s got a
lovely brown to it. And this should
take a few minutes. So like I said, you’re not
cooking through at this point. So we’re just going to take it
out so I can do the next batch. [MUSIC PLAYING] So this is on high heat. This idea is that we’re browning
rather than cooking through. If we were trying to cook
through at this point, I would lower the heat down. [MUSIC PLAYING] As you see, it’s
starting to get too brown on one side of the pan. You want to add
a little oil over there so that the
flour doesn’t burn. I’m going to take a
little of this out. Fresh oil. And I’m going to add my
celery and my onions. And from here you can lower
the heat down a little bit too. So about medium. I have some carrots I’ve
already cut into an oblique. I want to just show you
this cut real quick. So an oblique cut
is specifically for items that are not the
same width the whole way. So carrots, parsnips,
summer squashes. These are all great
for oblique cut. And you start with a large
angle and then you do turns. And as it gets thicker,
you angle your knife more. So you get carrots that
are basically the same size so they’ll cook evenly. Add them. So from here, what
we’re doing is we’re just browning the onions,
softening them up a little, creating a little sweetness. Getting any bits and fond up
off the pan from the chicken. And you want to cook that a
few minutes until the onions start to soften. So you can see
that the onions are starting to be come
a little translucent. You can turn the heat back up. Get a little caramelization. Sugar in the carrots,
in the onions will add a little nice
flavor to the dish. So this one we’re
making with apple cider, but you could use any
flavorings that you’d like. You could use red
wine, white wine. You could use
different vegetables. You could use mushrooms
or parsnips, turnips. You could use
shallots and garlic. There’s infinite
ways you can do this. You can add– at
this point, if you wanted to add some different
cumin, or coriander, any of your spices you could
add at this point too. When you have ground spices and
you put them in a little oil, it really helps them to
release their flavors. So at this point, I’m going to
deglaze with my cider vinegar first. Deglazing is simply adding
a cold liquid to a hot pan. And when you do that,
any fond, anything that’s stuck on the pan
will release from the pan and give your sauce flavor. So the vinegar has pretty much
evaporated off at this point, and I’m going to
add our apple cider. Then I’m going to
place my chicken back in the pan, skin side up. We have that lovely
brown skin, so you don’t want to put
it in the liquid because that’ll make it soggy. Add my bay leaves, a little
couple sprigs of thyme. And as you can see,
it’s at a boil. And so at this point,
I’m going to put it in the oven for
20 to 30 minutes, just to cook the
chicken through, reduce the sauce a little. And we’ll be ready. All right. The chicken should be ready now. So what we’re going
to do from here is bring it back up to a boil. And skim a little
of the grease off. [MUSIC PLAYING] And once you’ve done
that, we’re going to reduce the
sauce a little bit. And it’s ready to serve. [MUSIC PLAYING]

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