Is Grilling Really Bad for You?

Is Grilling Really Bad for You?


Hi, everyone. I am just finishing up. Putting some beautiful
grilled salmon and some corn onto my plate. How are we doing today? Oh, we are just
a few weeks away– grab my plate. We are just a few weeks away
from Memorial Day. And, go inside. And, Memorial Day is–
I don’t know. The official start of summer? How’s everyone doing? Let me just put this down. Yeah, it’s probably
the official start of summer and what else? Grilling season, cookouts,
barbecues, picnics. I wore my picnic shirt,
my barbecue shirt, summer parties. It’s the start
of a fabulous great season and I couldn’t be more excited. Unfortunately, grilling,
it gets, you know, kind of a bad rap
in the health and wellness community and as the summer season
starts to heat up, you’re going to hear more and more
health experts start to warn you of the health risks
associated with eating foods cooked and on the barbecue grill,
the backyard barbecue. Hello, everybody. Welcome, welcome,
welcome. Let’s have a little bit of fun
before we get into grilling and, you know,
the yay and the nays of grilling, let’s just have a little bit of fun. Let’s take a poll. I just want to see
who out there are my grill masters. Who are you guys? Top things– what are some of the top things
that people tend to grill. Ten of them. Top things that people tend to grill and you can put your answers
right down in the comments below. Bruce’ says George Foreman. Bruce, you probably are half kidding, however, I learned to cook meat
on the George Foreman grill back in the day when I was in college. Every single day I would make salmon. My poor hall mates were very angry
because unless you were eating it, it smelled kind of fishy. But, yeah, George Foreman grill
was my go-to. That’s how I learned. Alright.
Some top things– Ronald says corn. People roast corn, grill corn. What are some other top items
that people tend to grill. I’m going to give a little bit more time
and then I’m going to name some of the top food items
that people tend to grill. The very first one–
anyone know what the number one is? The number one thing
that people tend to grill is steak. That’s right.
Steak. Overwhelming amount of steak. And, the second thing
people grill, hot dogs. Then ribs come third. Hamburgers, fish, chicken, shrimp. “Shrimp on the barbi,” yeah.
Shrimp. The bratwursts shish kebabs
and number ten is the corn. That’s right, Carol,
beef is number one. Alright.
How many person– what is the percentage of Americans,
specifically Americans, who own an outdoor grill
or a smoker? The percentage of Americans who own an outdoor grill or a smoker. That’s right. Tom says, “Where’s the chicken?”
Chicken was number six. Number six for meat
that people grill. Seventy-five percent.
Very close, Tom. Seventy-five percent of Americans
own an outdoor grill or smoker. What percentage of men, typically,
versus women grill? There’s this old saying–
it’s very old, it’s antiquated that women cook and men grill
but that numbers are changing right now. Forty-four percent of men
tend to grill and women,
22% call them the grill master. Alright. What’s the number one
grilling holiday of the year? The number one grilling holiday
of the year? People go outside
and they grill on this holiday. Number one grilling holiday
of the year. Anyone have a guess? It’s a holiday. Yes!
Troy got it. It’s the 4th of July. Fireworks and the smell of grilling
outside, it’s very nostalgic. The second is Memorial Days, it’s the second grilling
holiday of the year. Memorial Day in just a few weeks away
and Father’s Day is the third and, of course, number four,
Labor Day. Alright, now, you know me, I look at the science,
the studies, the facts and I like to leave the emotion
and the speculation out when it comes to health issues. I got to thinking, now, can grilling foods really be that
dangerous, really, or bad for our health? Is it really a problem as I’m sinking
my teeth into a veggie burger? Is it a problem with all of the foods
or is it just specifically the meats? Can all the grilling things
that we put on to the grill be bad or is it specifically the meat? So, I put on my detective gear
and I went to work, and then–
this is my work. I went to work. And then, I became detective Nancy,
the doctor detective Nancy. I did a lot of research
into potential health issues associated with grilling
including taking a look at what foods are safe to grill and I looked at other healthier options when we tend to go
to our grilling machines. After completing and doing
a lot of my research, I think that it’s very fair to say
that you are going to be very shocked and you’re going to be surprised
at what I found. So, I want you to stay tuned. I’m going to share with you all of that
that I found in just a few minutes. Oh, and near the end of the show, I’m going to show you how to prep
y’all veggies for the grill and walk you through
my secret for grilling most delicious and perfectly cooked
veggies every single time. I’m also going to share
one of my absolute favorite of all time– of Dr. Nancy’s all-time
deliciously grilled fruit recipe. You’re going to be stunned
at how easy and delicious it really is. So, before we start, let’s take another quick
little viewer poll. Who likes to grill out there? Who grills pretty much
every single week? Five percent of us
grill every single week. Where are my grillers at? Give me a heart or thumbs up. Whoa, a lot of emojis.
Alright, awesome. Okay.
So, what do you guys like to grill? I love grilling salmon.
Love. And, asparagus. I love to grill a lot of my veggies
on the grill. My kids laugh because they sit there
and they pick off all the blacks out. They’re like, “What is this?” Okay, where are
my weekend warriors? What are you guys
whipping up out there? What is that face, Bruce? Alright.
What is your specialty? I would love to read
some of your stuff. Bruce says asparagus.
Me too! Let’s start by looking at
what the research says about grilling. Alright.
Let’s just start with the research. So, we can better understand
a little bit more about why health professional lately
are more actively now warning us against eating too much grilled,
smoked, blackened and charred meats. The key words here are “too much.” Too much smoked,
too much blackened, too much charred. According to a recent study
that tracked the eating habits of more than 62,000 people
over a nine-year period and this is a very extensive study. So, 62,000 people
over a nine-year period regularly consumed well-done
or charred meat increase the risk of developing pancreatic or colorectal
cancer by up to 60%. Sixty percent.
That’s massive, that’s big. Research also found
that the higher temperatures and longer cooking times
of cooking meats led to higher levels
of HCAs and PAHs. HCAs, does anyone know
what this stands for? You get a gold star. HCAs, heterocyclic amines and PAHs,
polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Say that five times. That’s right.
So, those are what we don’t want. So, HCAs.
What? PAHs.
Come again? What in the world
am I talking about, right? Let me explain and then I’m done
with the science, I promise. What is important here to understand
is that these are the things that are detrimental to your health,
that are causing inflammation. So, we want to look at that and then we just want to prevent that
from even coming into our bodies. Okay. So, the PAHs form– the PAHs, okay,
they form, they’re created– And, we’re going to talk about
the influences but they are created
when fat from the meat drips onto the hot coals
or the grill element and then gets deposited
back onto the food because of the flame flare-ups,
the flame ups which create more smoke. Okay, the smoke contains the PAHs
with which then permit the meat that you are grilling
and it’s created and influenced by the temperature of cooking. How long the food is cooked, the distance food is cooked from
the grill flame and the fat content of the food. The HCAs on the other hand– the HCA’s are produced
when red meat, poultry and fish they meet high-heat cooking
such as grilling or boiling. These are harmful chemical byproducts
that form while the meat is being cooked. Okay, we understand? So, the PAHs and the HCA carcinogens
have both been found to cause damage and changes in the DNA
that can increase your risk of developing specific types of cancer. That’s right. Essentially, the hotter
and the longer meat is cooked, the more HCAs and PAHs are formed. Okay. The hotter and longer
meat is cooked, the more HCAs and PAHs are formed. Yeah, that’s right, Bruce. Bruce gave me lots of angry, sad
and inflamed teary faces. Absolutely. So, is there a safe, healthy way
to grill meats? Who thinks they know? Is there a safe and healthy way? Absolutely, yes. Don’t let the doom and gloom
of this research scare you away from grilling all together. Let’s review seven important
and effective safety measures that the American Institute
for Cancer Research suggests that you follow
when you grilled meats. So, these are ways to grill safely. Alright.
Ways to grill safely. Alright.
Number one, go lean. Trim the fat off your meat. This helps to reduce
the flame flare ups and charring. I’d recommend sticking
with mostly lean chicken and sustainably raised fish like you find in the
anti-inflammatory diet. Yay?
Yay, yay? When I say, “Yay, yay.”
You say, “Yay, yay, yay.” Alright.
Number two. You know what?
Location matters. Cook your meat
in the center of your grill where the temperature
are more accurate and consistent. Cook in the center of your grill. And, make sure to flip
grilling meats frequently to avoid the charring and blackening
from forming on one side in particular. Alright. The next one is to go small.
Go small. Cut meat into smaller portions
to shorten cooking time, lessening the chances of overcooking
or charring or blackening the meat. Go small. Go home and go small. The next one is to marinate. Who marinates as a good practice? Statistically, women tend to marinate
more than men. I don’t know. So, yeah, marinate. Studies suggest that marinating
your meat before grilling can decrease the formation
of those HCAs that we talked about, the carcinogenic compounds
by 70% to 85%. That’s pretty massive. The American Institute
for Cancer Research says that marinating meat
for at least 30 minutes is sufficient to reduce
the formation of HCAs. Oh, and make sure you are choosing
healthy options to marinate. I avoid the premade stuff. Make your own with some olive oil,
some lemon, crushed garlic, fresh herbs like oregano,
thyme, rosemary. Black pepper is awesome,
sea salt as well. Don’t be afraid to be bold
with your marinades either. Use fresh ginger and tamari
and apple cider vinegar and balsamic and red wine. These mix and match
really, really well, provide you with some
really good bold flavors, awesome healthy flavors
your whole family will enjoy. Alright.
The next one is to dab. My kids would be so proud of me.
I don’t even know if I did it right. Dab.
Dab your meat dry. Dab. I know that sounds terrible
in a way, dab your meat. But, say it out loud three times,
it will rub off. Dab your meat. Dry the marinade
and extra juices from your meats. Okay?
With a paper towel. To cut down on the charring
of the meats from the flames, dripping marinades
equal big flames which makes the meat char
even quicker. I literally pat my meat dry
with a paper towel and rub a little bit
of olive oil over it before I grill and it works perfectly. Thank you, James,
for laughing at my one joke. It’s people like you, James,
keeps me going all day. Alright.
The next one is to pre-cook your meat. Anyone out there pre-cook
their meat? Reduce the time your meat
is exposed to flames by partially cooking it
in an oven or on your stove. And, this also helps
keep your meat safe from bacteria. I do this when I’m grilling chicken,
in particular. I parboil, P-A-R,
parboil the chicken in water, seasoned with herbs,
lemon and spices. Parboiling means
pre-cooking the chicken. I then finish it on the grill, discarding the skin
before eating, of course. And, this is a beautiful
piece of parboiled chicken that I grilled as well. Mmm. So, so, so good.
Alright. The next one is to grill
your fruits and vegetables. Who grills their fruits
and vegetables besides me? Grill your fruits and vegetables. Grilling vegetables and fruits
does not produce the HCAs and the PAHs. Yay!
Carcinogen-free. Plus, as you know,
that it’s high in plant foods are associated with lower risk of cancer,
improved heart health and reduced levels of inflammation
in the body. That’s what we want. Plus, grilling vegetables and even
the fruits bring out so much flavor. It’s so yummy.
It’s really, really delicious. I’ve never grown fruits or vegetables
before I learned how to get less toxins into my body. I’m like, “Okay, well, what can I do? How can I be a grill master, sensei?
and still keep the toxins out?” Grill your fruits and vegetables. Okay, so, if you’ve never
grilled fruits and vegetables, then you are really missing out. It’s really easy to do
and I’m going to show you how to do pineapple
in just a few smidgens of a moment. You can really grow nearly
any fruit actually or any vegetable. When you’re done, your whole family
will enjoy and they taste so good. Heidi, you got to try. You got to try
and I’ll show you how to do it. Alright.
What’s your favorite grilled vegetable? I know a lot of people said corns,
a lot of people said asparagus. Tell me some of the things
that you experiment with or as a family favorite
and share it with us. Your Smarter family. I like to say that. Smarter family.
Alright. Sweet corn,
sweet, sweet corn. I’m going to show you
some of the things that I love to grill. Sweet corn.
Here are some sweet corn. There is corn that is grilled. How delicious is that? And, you can put
a little bit of sea salt on it with some parsley
or some cilantro on it. I love grilling sweet corn. It’s a family favorite
and it’s a great summer treat. Just look for local, organic,
non-GMO corn. It’s very big.
Non-GMO corn. And, actually,
for all of our vegetables, really, organic is the way to go. Zucchini is a great way. You take your zucchini,
you can slice it long way so that becomes like these
thin layers. Brush it with olive oil,
a little bit of salt and a little bit of pepper,
grills perfectly. So, so yummy,
so delicious. Yellow summer squash,
you can do it the same way. Onions, you can cut it horizontally and then you can grill that
perfectly on the grill. If you have a pan that has holes in it,
you can also grow it that way so it doesn’t slide through
all of the racks. Romaine lettuce is a great way
to grill. Anyone have a habit
of grilling romaine lettuce? So easy. Yeah, Barbara says watermelon.
Absolutely. What kind of corn?
That one is a white corn. You can definitely do
yellow corn as well. Okay, Bruce. Romaine lettuce is really easy to grill. You use the whole entire heart,
this very, very center. And, you can spray it with olive oil
or drizzle it and then you can just literally 30 seconds
on each side and just grill it and it becomes this soft, warm,
perfect, staple to any meal in the summer. So yummy, so easy to do. Asparagus is also really perfect. You can just take the asparagus
and drizzle with olive oil, you can brush it on there. Some sea salt if you like or Himalayan salt
and pepper if you’d like. And then, you can grill it.
Very, very easy. Yummy. Okay. Anyone have any–
Grilled veggies on a salad, yes. Grilled veggies on a salad.
Pumpkin, David. Oh, how is grilled pumpkin?
Very nice. Corn is inflammatory
to most people. If you do, choose to have some corn–
Mexican corn that’s right. If you do choose to have corn,
make sure you don’t eat it a lot and you pick the organic,
non-GMO corn, alright. Yes, corn is nature’s toothbrush,
Bruce. Oh, let’s talk about
asparagus really fast. So, I’m going to give you
a little tip on asparagus. Okay. So, asparagus
is very, very easy to grill. Who loves to grill asparagus? Your going to hold
the asparagus in both hands. I have rubber bands on them, keep them all in place
so it doesn’t go flying on me. Asparagus is extremely
woody and stringy and the bottom half
that I’m going to break off. You see that?
You know it’s fresh. The bottom half just broke off,
you can put this off to the side and when you have enough you can
actually freeze it and put in a bag and when you have enough, you can
actually make it into vegetable stock so that’s really yummy to have. But, literally,
just pluck it off like that and then you can grill it. Super, super, super yummy. You can also do this
with carrots or celery, anything like that if you love to. Very easy.
Always make sure you cut off the ends. And, if your vegetables
are a little bit wilty, cut off the ends
and then stick them into water for about an hour or two
and it sucks up all the water and it gets really, really firm again. Alright, back to my asparagus
really fast. After you’ve trimmed the asparagus
on the very, very bottom. Again, drizzle it with olive oil or you can toss it
with coconut oil just a little bit. And then, you can put it on
to your preheated grill. Two minutes. Two minutes is all it takes
and then you flip it for two more minutes. Two minutes,
flip it for two more minutes. And then, when it starts
to turn bright green, you might see some grill marks forming. Don’t panic, it’s totally okay. These grill marks are not harmful. Take the asparagus off of the heat. Two minutes, flip, two minutes take it off the heat,
sprinkle with a little bit sea salt, little squeeze of lemon. I love lemons. A little squeeze of lemon
and then you can serve it. Alright. Do you know,
only a small percentage of people do not have the enzymes
to break down the asparagus and the beets for that matter. So, if you do eat asparagus and then your urine
tends to smell a certain way, very acidic. That is because your body
just doesn’t have the enzyme to break down the asparagus
and beets the same way. So, if you eat beets
and then you feel like you’re peeing blood because your urine is red,
it’s very natural, it’s just the enzyme
that’s inside the vegetables. It’s good to know, right? Okay. Many people are surprised
to learn that you can grill fruit. I actually grill fruit quite a bit. I have my kids take part in it. It’s very, very fun. Pineapples and peaches
even watermelon. Someone said watermelon earlier. Believe it or not,
they’re super, super delicious and very, very easy and I’m going
to show you one of my favorites. You can take different fruits,
you can use peaches, you can use mangoes,
whatever you want to use. I have some pineapple here. I cut it into little triangles and then you’re going to
just take some skewers and you just start skewering. I kind of like you’re doing
a shish kebab and then you just have it
have at it. Just spear it. Kind of make like a fruit shish kebab. And then, you just fill it up
and then you can put pepper on it or chili flake–
I mean just anything you want and it tastes so yummy
and you can flavor your salads. You can flavor your salads
with your grilled vegetables and they taste so, so yummy. Alright.
You can wait until it caramelize and it just,
oh, it’s like little heaven bites. What do you guys think? Yeah, you guys are good? Okay. Let’s wrap this puppy up. Wrapping it up. The research is pretty clear. A growing body of science suggests
that regularly grilling or cooking meats at high temperatures is not the best
for your body over time. However, there are effective ways
to make sure that you are doing the best to minimize the risk
of carcinogenic chemicals. From well-cooked or charred meats
and that’s what we want to not have in our bodies,
the carcinogen chemicals, right? Okay, I recommend following
a number of tips for safely grilling meats
including some of my tips, trimming the excess fat. Go lean. Trim the excess fat
from the meat and choose naturally lean meats
like chicken and fish. Cooking your meats in the center,
location matters. Cooking your meats
in the center of the grill where the temperature
is more consistent and easier to control
is another great tip. Cutting meat into smaller pieces,
smaller pieces to cook quicker. You might even want to cut up
meats and vegetables to cook them on skewers,
that also cuts down the cooking time that it’s in the flames. Use marinades to coat the meat, it’s a great and fantastic way
to impart flavor but also provides a layer of protection
between the meat and then the open flames. Just make sure to dry,
remember to dab, dab off the excess marinade from the meat
with a paper towel before you grill. You can also pre-cook, parboil,
pre-cook the meat so they cook quicker on the grill
and I do this with chicken and I parboil it
with a bunch of great seasonings like lemon–
lemon really is a great go-to, lemon, sea salt, garlic and herbs. And, you can always opt
to grill fruits and vegetables. Just prep them the way
that I just showed you on a skewer and make sure that
you don’t grill them to death. You want a little bit of live nutrients
in there. Just a few minutes on each side. Okay. So, as you can see,
not all grilling is dangerous. Summer is saved. Memorial Day, Fourth of July, saved. I hope you found that today’s video
was definitely helpful. Do you have other health topics
that you would like for me to talk about? Then, let me know. Put it in the comments below. Make sure that you post
your questions or topics and so that I can re-watch
and go through this. If there’s anything that you missed
in today’s show or in any other previous shows
you can definitely go back onto the Smarter Nutrition
Facebook page and re-watch as often as you want
and then just share this with a lot of your friends
and your family. Goodbye, Carol.
Thank you for having you on here. And, Heidi, good to see you
and you’re very welcome. And, tune in tomorrow, the topic we cover might just be
based on the questions that you asked. Hope you guys are having
a wonderful, wonderful day. Thank you, again, for joining me
and I will see you here tomorrow. James says,
“What alcohol is the safest?” Water, James. Off to drink your water. Here, this alcohol. It’s called water, spring water. So, when in doubt, reach for water. Have a wonderful day.
I’ll see you tomorrow. Bye-bye.

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