My Coffee Journey: Mike Asuncion, owner of Silca Coffee Roasting Company

My Coffee Journey: Mike Asuncion, owner of Silca Coffee Roasting Company


I think coffee is a very personal experience. So it depends on your mood. It depends on what you feel like at that moment. Coffee experience is one that you would enjoy,
the way you like it actually and that is the beauty of coffee; as you can make it the way
you feel like at that time. So you can have a brewed coffee, when you
want something bold and more robust. You can have an espresso shot, if you want
something quick and on the go. If you want to share coffee among a lot of
friends, you can prepare a pour over. So it’s really about your personal preference
and the way that you want to make it. So coffee starts on a tree,
it starts as a coffee berry which is green. After several months, this coffee berry gets
bigger and bigger and it start to ripen into a cherry so you
can like you’ll already see it go from green to red. When it’s red, what you can see is a cherry,
it’s ready to get picked. Ideally you would pick only the red ones to
get the most ripe fruit. Kind of like with any food, you want to get
the ripest, most delicious ones. After you picked the coffee, they have different
ways to process it: wet process, dry process, washed process. I’ll talk more specifically about here in
Cavite. We do the dry process. So you’ll pick the coffee and then you lay
it out to dry either on a raise bed or a lot of farmers
will put it on a cement or a tarp on the ground. After it’s dried, it turns brown and then
you can identify if it’s dry enough if you grab it on your hand and you shake
it and it sounds like a Caracas as you can feel the beans really shaking on
your hand and when that happens you know that it’s ready to get milled. Milling is basically taking off the husk. It’s basically de-husking it. You’re running it to a mill with a blade
that helps you to extract the green beans inside. When you get the green beans, usually from
the farm, there are some impurities, there are some
rocks, some sticks, some stones so what we do is
we handpick everything. One woman can handpick only 60 kilos within day
so it really does take a lot of time and after you handpicked it,
you take out the impurities, we further sift the coffee to size it. So we get the larger sizes which go for a
more premium blends and the smaller ones we set aside and then
it’s ready for roasting. So we put it in the roaster, here at our place
like one batch is
usually like 12 to 15 minutes and are all set. You can have your whole bean coffee or the
next step would be to use a grinder and then make an espresso shot or a brewed coffee. With ground coffee the molecular walls of the beans have already been cracked open so with whole bean coffee the outer shell the molecular structure has been crushed and that releases all of the fragrance and aroma and that’s when it comes out. So having a whole beans allows you to preserve that longer. We really have to put it in a cool dry place so if it’s still on the pack, don’t put it on direct sunlight don’t put it on a hot place usually if you’re in the kitchen just put it in a covered If you open it, I would suggest to transfer it to an airtight container and also new packaging these days it has resealable-tip types or resealable tapes or zipped top but nothing can beat an
air tight container which you can really seal. Some people like to put it on a fridge also
and that is fine. Well the grinder is essential. It is a critical part of a coffee brewing
process because with the wrong grind you would extract the coffee differently. So each coffee process requires a different
grind. Espresso is a very fine grind. It is a fast extraction going to the portafilter. It needs a very condensed, packed grind so
you can tamp it properly and have a proper extraction. On the other side of the spectrum,
you have a coffee press where you need a course grind you need a course grind because it’s a slower
brewing method. It’s an immersion process so the grounds
are immersed with the hot water to brew the coffee so you need more surface area to extract
the coffee properly. So it just really depends on the type of coffee
you make to match the grind. The type of grinder is very important because
of the blades, the settings. The thing I’d like about this Breville Smart
Grinder, it’s very easy to set, it’s digital, it
shows you with the icon for espresso all the way to a plunger. I think it’s like 60 settings so it’s
very easy also for a novice coffee or someone new to coffee to make good quality coffee
if you have the right equipment. The settings are easy to do. It’s also a burr grinder so it has a very
uniform grind. So it’s not just like setting it right but
you can set it right and the machine will do the rest for you. So yes, the grinder is very important to make
coffee. So like I mentioned earlier, depending on
the brew method you wanna match the grind to the brew method so course for a drip or
pour over or french press and then fine for espresso So we have a lot of ground coffee in the supermarket
which is packed and sealed with a packaging with one way valves. We put there one year for the expiry. It’s actually safe to consume beyond that
but we would suggest that you consume it maybe within 3 months so us, as a roaster with our
own distribution, we’re the ones to put it in the market ourselves also we distribute
it. Our goal is to get it in the soonest and the
fastest turnover in the market. Long story and short that answer is as soon
as possible. You want to get fresh coffee. We clearly mark the expiration date trying
to get the freshest. The important factors for the coffee experience
are: first, the coffee. So choose a coffee that you love. There are many origins, many blends out there,
and many types. Choose the one you love and it’s the ingredients
right, so make sure you’re using clean water. Coffee is like more than 90 percent water
so you make sure that you have good water and then the equipment. Make sure that you have good equipment that
can extract the coffee well, that can grind the coffee well and lastly is the proportion. You can have like the right grind but if you
put too much coffee, it won’t have the right taste I guess at the end of the day it depends on
you. Maybe you want to have it stronger today and
lighter in the afternoon. It’s really the proportion is up to you. I think the last step is the human inside
to it is whatever machine you have, it’s just the machine, it’s how you handle it
so you can practice on that machine, learn how to get different flavors by setting it
in different way and that’s the nice thing with modern machines. There is a lot of different settings, a lot
of places you can fine tune so I see those are the main things the coffee, the water, the grind proportion, the machine and then your skill as a home barista, as your own
personal coffee maker. Hi, I’m Mike Asuncion, owner of Silca Coffee
Roasting Company and proud partner of Breville Philippines. We freshly roast our Silcafe and Kick-Start
Coffee right here in Silang, Cavite. If you want to know more, visit our website
here or check this out on facebook.

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