Project Extreme Brewing: Carton Brewing

Project Extreme Brewing: Carton Brewing


Sam: I can honestly say that I’ve never started
my day, at least not this early, with a pastrami sandwich from a Jewish deli. The things we do for “Extreme Brewing.” Sam: You can make a great beer with just four
ingredients: barley, hops, water and yeast. But to make an extreme beer, those four ingredients
put together the same old way isn’t enough. This is “Project Extreme Brewing.” Sam: Today, I’m joined by Augie Carton of
New Jersey’s Carton Brewery and we’re going to be making Deli. You heard me right. It’s a beer inspired by the flavors of a pastrami
sandwich. But first, we need to go make one to understand
flavor. Sam: We’re at Coastal Delaware’s most famous
Jewish delicatessen, Rosenfeld’s. They are known for their pastrami sandwich. Sam: What do you think? What is the classic ratio of ingredients and–? Augie: I think, so– So there’s something
about the Jewish deli thing where they’re always way over-stacking, but I think you
should go about three fingers deep with the meat, mustard on both sides. When you’re asked by you and the Alstroms
to do something interesting, I thought it would be fun to explore umami. The deli sandwich is the one that because
of its contrasts, because all of those flavors. You got your sour in the pickle. You got your heat in the mustard. Sweetness in the bread, which is the rye. All those contrasting that rich, really just
the warm pastrami and just that– that unctuousness, that feeling. Sam: Yeah. Augie: But you find the unctuousness, the
richness of the meat by the contrasting four other flavors going on. Sam: Yeah. Augie: Every time I’ve– somebody’s had a
hard time figuring out what I meant, I’m like, “Just go get a proper pastrami on rye with
a pickle–” Sam: Yeah. Augie: “Spicy mustard on it. And that feeling that’s in the middle of those
four flavors, that’s what sells it.” So that’s what I deconstructed for the– for
the book was how to do that. Sam: Yeah. Augie: I’m just loving this sandwich, man. Sam: Yeah. Augie: You go back to talking. I’m eating more.
Sam: Yeah. I don’t know what else I have to say except,
Lunch is served.” Augie:Sam: After the sandwich build, we rolled ourselves
out to Brewings & Eats to get started on the liquid sandwich. That meant we had to go next door to do some
ingredient prep for the homemade pastrami rub destined for the boil. Sam: You said earlier that you’ve got to use
a little imagination. How do you guys as a company decide, “This
is what we want our brand to stand for and to show off at Extreme Beer Fest in 2017?” Augie: So we believe the extreme for us is
the creativity. We made a hardcore policy amongst ourselves
that we would never bring the same beer to EBF twice. I’m always more impressed when somebody does
something truly amazing with flavors where you don’t think they can. Right? Sam: Yeah. Augie: You know what I mean? Sam: Yeah. Augie: When you’re down to 3 percent and you’ve
got real flavor, it’s– Sam: Right. You can’t hide behind the intensity of the
alcohol. Augie: Yeah, and it’s pretty amazing. Sam: Our first sour beer we did about 14 years
ago was the Festina Peche which was, you know, a Belgian wild ale brewed with local peaches. And right now we have Fifer’s doing acres
of peaches for our new version– Augie: Right on. Sam: Of that beer. And so those local beers for us, we love that
opportunity to engage in the local agricultural community. How does the concept of local play into Carton
Brewery’s philosophy? Augie: Well, the answer to that is I’m a local. My kids are the seventh generation of my family
that have lived within eight miles of where my brewery is. Sam: Seven generations. Augie: Yeah.
Augie: The conceit there is that my flavors, what I like, what I need things to taste like
are borne of being part of that world. Sam: Yeah. Augie: If I make stuff that tastes good to
me, it’ll taste good to enough of my community because we have a common table that we all
eat at. Sam: Speaking of extreme approaches–
Augie:Sam: This is the part of our show we like
to refer to as Liquid Truth Serum. Right under our table there happens to be
a half growler, but what we do is we sip on Liquid Truth Serum–
Augie:Sam: While I ask you some pointed questions. Augie: All right. Sam: Are you ready, Augie? Augie: I think I am. Sam: Liquid Truth Serum. Augie: Fire. Let’s see how this goes. Sam: Let’s do this. Sam: Name a beer in your history of commercial
brewing that you were like, “Oh, yeah. This one, this is going to be a disaster,”
and then all of a sudden it was one of your best sellers and you didn’t expect it. Augie: We have a tree in our backyard that
grows mulberries, so I went straight into a Berliner, a kettle sour Berliner. Sam: Yeah. Augie: Put it in there and put together a
beer that’s kind of this light pink champagne color with one of the dullest tree fruits
in the world. Everybody thought I was nuts, eight months
into brewing to be putting out a kettle sour with mulberries in it. Sam: Mulberries, Yeah. Augie: Well, you know. You’re a happy husband. It made my wife happy. Sam: That’s important. Important. Augie: I figured–
Sam: That’s the, literally– Augie:
Sam: The most truthful thing that’s ever been said on Liquid Truth Serum: keep your wives
happy. Augie: It is. And then–
Sam: Is it now an annual tradition? Augie: Well, it is. And we gave it a year off because I wanted
to go to something different. Sam: Yeah. People got mad at you. Augie: And I got yelled at. Sam: Yes. Augie: I got yelled at. Sam: Cheers, Augie. Sam: So, Augie and I came together to brew
this beautiful beer, Deli. And basically, Deli is sort of a turbocharged
quick version of a Flanders Red that’s not like any Flanders Red anyone’s ever had before. Because basically what we did here was deconstructed
the components of a stacked sandwich and brought them into this quick sort of kettle sour beer
that has this super-pungent, enticing, mouth-watering, savory and sweet umami characteristics that
you would get from your best Jewish deli sandwich. So Deli is representing that in liquid form
in a way no other beer has ever done. Cheers, Augie. Sam: So if you got a hankering to kind of
combine the culinary brewing worlds in something as adventurous as this beautiful Deli beer
that we did with Carton, pick up a copy of “Project Extreme Brewing,” the book that I
wrote with the Alstrom brothers. It has over 40 recipes from 30-something odd
adventurous, creative brewing legends, and it is available anywhere that you buy great
books. Also available at Dogfish.com. Get brewing.

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