Stouts: Seattle Brewery Walking Tours with Doug McNair of Redhook Ale Brewing

Stouts: Seattle Brewery Walking Tours with Doug McNair of Redhook Ale Brewing


(Steps) (Slurp) (Boing) Ahhh……. Burp…. (Irish music…..) (Narrator Mark Sparks)
Ireland too has a brewing tradition with very deep roots, but to the Irish nothing compares to a stout. The closest thing
they have to a national drink. (off screen, pub sounds) “A real Irishman.” “That’s a good one.” (off screen: “Ha ha.”) (Doug McNair, The Redhood Ale Brewery)
“Stouts, are a world unto themselves. There’s quite a few different subcategories of them, that are very distinctive from each other. You can have an oatmeal stout, which is one
that’s made with, not just malted barley, but it actually has some oatmeal added
to the mash tun in the brewing process. And that tends to impart a
creaminess to it that is very nice. Another style of stout is an Imperial Stout,
and that is a kind that is a very big beer. It’s a very alcoholic. It was originally brewed in England for import to the Czar’s of Russia, which is why it’s the imperial court And they had to make it very high alcohol to transport
it that distance without it going bad. So it was very robust it’s… it’s the stout of stouts. (Narrator Mark Sparks)
The name Stout was shortened from Stout Porter, a darker version of the popular English Porter. Like Porter, Stouts are quite dark
and extremely full-bodied, but they’re also richer and in some cases creamier. There’s an English version too,
known as Milk Stout which can be very sweet.

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